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    Posted September 15, 2013 by
    egmom1972
    Location
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Tell us the Good Stuff!

    Exceptional medical staff

     

    CNN PRODUCER NOTE     Colorado dad Kevin Wade told us that Joshua, who is 9, and his stuffed wolf pal were treated at Memorial Hospital for Children in Colorado Springs on Friday. Joshua suffered severe reflux as a baby, and recently experienced some complications requiring him to undergo an endoscopy. 'That stuffed animal means the world to him, that's his baby, and to know they thought enough of him to take care of his little baby is sweet,' Wade said. 'Everybody in healthcare nowadays gets such a bad rap. For them to take that little extra minute and take care of that, it was really special.'

    Pediatric gastroenterologist Christine Waasdorp Hurtado said the wolf had an inch-long hole in the seam of one of his shoulders. She quietly sewed up the animal while Joshua was going under anesthesia, put a bandage on the wolf's 'intravenous site' and brought him out with a surgical mask and gloves on his paws. 'It took me 5 minutes and it made such a huge difference for him,' Hurtado said. She has previously done a teddy bear operation and has wrapped up 'lots of stuffed animals' with IV sites. 'Being part of a children's hospital, they really encourage us to go that little extra bit to make a difference for families and kids.'

    Within a couple days of returning home, Joshua took off the wolf's bandages and pronounced him 'all better.' Joshua is also doing well on a new gluten-free diet.

    His dad first shared this story on Facebook, where a friend saw it and posted on iReport.

    We all know how much stuffed animals mean to kids, but especially children in the hospital. See how social media users rallied to find a replacement rabbit for a boy during cancer treatment.

    Have some Good Stuff to share? Send it to iReport!
    - dsashin, CNN iReport producer

    This is from my friend, Kevin Wade, in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

     

    “Joshua had an endoscopy today, September 13, 2013. He has such a warm personality and despite being nervous he made fast friends with everyone present for his procedure. He took his favorite stuffed animal (a wolf) to keep him company while he was sedated and Joshua introduced his wolf to all of the medical staff. Through the course of the introductions Joshua noticed that his stuffed animal had a hole by his right front leg and needed stitches. Everyone smiled, laughed and explained that his wolf would be better off getting stitches at home. Joshua smiled too and agreed to let me sew up his wolf when we got home. He snuggled his ill, baby wolf as he drifted off to sleep.

     

    The endoscopy went smoothly and Joshua was soon in recovery. As I walked into recovery I saw my sweet boy still asleep... on his tummy was that little wolf. It had been given a surgical mask and a leg cast. Upon further inspection I observed that he had approximately 5 or 6 surgical quality sutures.

     

    As a result, Joshua spent his initial moments in recovery focusing on his wolf rather than any discomfort from his procedure. Fighting back tears I thanked the doctors and nurses. It was such a sweet gesture by busy, but caring professionals and I will never forget it. Neither will my little boy. I'm a lucky man.”

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