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    Posted December 5, 2013 by
    farmswills2
    Location
    New york, New York

    How to learn digital photography? Best digital photography books.

     

    digital photography classes, learn digital photography, digital photography lessons, digital photography books, best digital photography books, digital photography courses, How to learn digital photography

     

    Step 1: Put your digital camera on a tripod. HDR pictures are ideal when they have been taken on a tripod. If you can keep your digital camera really stable, then you could hypothetically take the bracketed set of pictures without a tripod, but I always recommend against this because the outcomes are less than ideal.

     

    Step 2: Put your digital camera in Aperture Concern method. Because we take 2 or more pictures and then mixing them, the pictures must consistency with regards to concentrate and aperture. Also, put your ISO down to as low as it can go (ISO 200 or lower) and put your white-colored stability to something other than Automated.

     

    Step 3: Guide Focus. Focus as you would normally then convert off automatic concentrating to make sure that the lens doesn't try to pay attention to something else when you take the other exposures. I've discovered that this usually performs excellent with auto-focus remaining on, but if you are a perfectionist, changing over to manual is ideal.

     


    Step 3: Take the bracketed set of images. To be able to take a set of bracketed images, please make reference to your digital cameras manual, or Search engines the phrase “auto bracketing” and then “your digital camera model” (example: auto bracketing D50) and you will discover your response. Not all digital cameras are able of bracketing images. If this is the situation for you, you will need to personally take a bracketed set of pictures by modifying the shutter rate. Every digital camera is different, so I can't recommend on this aspect. Some digital cameras have control buttons that allow you to segment your pictures, and some digital cameras only allow it through the selection.

     

    You can take as much or as little pictures as you want. A conventional fast HDR picture includes one picture that is 2 prevents underexposed, one picture that is completely revealed, and one picture that is overextended by 2 prevents. This creates a bracketed set of (-2, 0, +2). You can even take more if you wish, like a (-4, -3, -2, -1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4) or a (-4, -2, 0, +2, +4), but not all digital cameras can instantly take that many, so you may need to do it personally by modifying the shutter rate for each personal visibility you take.

     

    You can, on the other hand, just take only one RAW picture without picking a bracketed set of pictures. I would only do this when there are shifting topics (people, creatures, vehicles, etc.) in your structure because shifting topics can't be documented effectively across three personal supports. If you do end up picking a bracketed set of pictures and there are shifting topics in it, there are blurry elimination resources available in both CS5 and Photomatix.

     


    digital photography classes, learn digital photography, digital photography lessons, digital photography books, best digital photography books, digital photography courses, How to learn digital photography

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