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  • Not vetted for CNN

  • Posted December 12, 2013 by
    mahendradash
    Location
    India
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Tech talk

    More from mahendradash

    3D Virtual birth simulator

     
    3D Virtual birth simulator

    University of East Anglia last month announced that UEA researchers have pioneered a patient-specific 3D virtual birth simulator. The research' aim is a virtual birthing simulator that can help doctors and midwives prepare for unusual or dangerous births. "Patient-specific" is the key aspect of their work, as the program takes into account the mother's body shape and the position of the baby to predict what might take place during the birth event.
    The team prepared their presentation last month for the International Conference on E-Health and Bioengineering in Romania, which took place from November 21 to November 23. Dr Rudy Lapeer, from the university's school of computing sciences, said, 'We are creating a forward-engineered simulation of childbirth using 3D graphics to simulate the sequence of movements as a baby descends through the pelvis during labor." The study is titled, "Towards a Forward Engineered Simulation of the Cardinal Movements of Human Childbirth'." The authors are Zelimkhan Gerikhanov, Vilius Audinis and Rudy Lapeer.
    The user inputs the patient's relevant anatomical data –size and shape of the pelvis, the baby's head and torso, for example. The simulation software will see ultrasound data used to re-create a geometric model of a baby's skull and body in 3D graphics as well as the mother's body and pelvis. This will make the medical team more aware of scenarios that can take place during birth. For example, one would see if the baby's shoulders could get stuck during childbirth. According to the university release, "Programmers are also taking into account the force from the mother pushing during labor and are even modeling a 'virtual' midwife's hands which can interact with the baby's head."

    techexplore.com

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