Share this on:
 E-mail
7,139
VIEWS
28
COMMENTS
 
SHARES
About this iReport
  • Approved for CNN

  • Click to view Richardlucas's profile
    Posted December 31, 2013 by
    Richardlucas
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Sound off

    More from Richardlucas

    Gender Identity Bathroom Crisis: I think, therefore I am

     

    CNN PRODUCER NOTE     You can read more about California's new law regarding gender identity and school facilities on CNN, or see the full text of the law.

    Update: Richardlucas says he wishes he hadn’t written this essay after seeing how hurtful his words were to some transgender people. Read his full reflections here, and see how a transgender woman responded to his essay here.

    - rachel8, CNN iReport producer

    @RichJLucas

     

    After hearing so much about this controversial law, I decided to read it for myself. I was quite taken back by what I found. I expected to find a long and drawn out bill, laced with legal jargon and specific regulations. What I found was nothing of the sort; merely a loose plan literally opening the doors of privacy and tossing the anatomically preset boundaries that we are rightly accustomed to aside.


    Thanks to the newly minted law; AB 1266, kids in California will now be able to use bathrooms and locker rooms based on the gender that they identify with, not their actual gender.

     

    You heard it right folks, should a boy show up to public school on Monday and decide that he suddenly feels like a girl, he can now wander freely into the girls locker room, hop in the shower and allow all to see his true colors. And there is nothing school officials can do about it.

     

    Imagine the Porky’s shower scene if they had this law in place. There would have been no need for sneaking around in the plumbing, they could have waltzed right in, proclaimed their feminine instincts, and the scene would have been complete. Much less funny, extremely uncomfortable, but complete.

     

    Crazy? Insane!

     

    It’s so wildly obscure because there is nothing in place to ensure that these privileges are not abused. After all, if it’s all in your mind, how can school officials deem that one person is in fact identifying with the opposite gender, or just wanting to encounter the opposite gender in their unmentionables? They can’t. It’s impossible.


    Let’s say fictional little boy/girl Todd wanders into the girls bathroom. He acknowledges that by birth he’s a boy, but he identifies as a girl, so he has a right to be there. He’s not dressed as a girl, because he or she feels like a tomboy, so he dresses like a male. Though he feels like a girl, he’s also a lesbian, so he’s attracted to girls. Now he is free and protected to peruse the locker room uninhibited because he’s just being little boy/girl Todd. Does anyone else see a problem with this?

     

    So what should we expect?

     

    If this new idea should sweep the nation, we could be in for some interesting times ahead. Supporters say that it’s preposterous that we should think that people will use this new freedom for evil, and scoff at the idea that it may encourage sex offenders to explore unchartered territory. I say, if you don’t foresee that happening, you have lost your mind.


    I understand that in theory an all-encompassing universal level of tolerance is a lovely idea. But so is a world free of war, poverty and of course, sex offenders. Unfortunately, we do not live in such bliss, and must consider the dangerous consequences that such a frivolous and irresponsible law will likely bring.


    This law is a guise, a cover pretending to promote equality. It is not promoting equality. It is forcing society to conform, and expose its children to concepts that a developing adolescent mind can’t possibly comprehend, and should not have to.


    There are some people that will be thrilled by this new design:

     

    Derek Robert Bathgate, who likes to put hidden cameras in bathroom clocks, is probably ecstatic. No longer will he have to sneakily install his spy gear, he can just choose to be a girl and head to the Y changing rooms and go nuts with his iPhone.


    How about Joel Hardman, who went as far as to dress up as a woman to gain entry to the other halves dressing quarters. Don’t worry Joel, if this keeps going you can leave the dress at home, now you’ll only need to claim that you identify as a girl.


    There’s also that fella in Colorado who likes to peak under porta-potties. Well sir, stand up and brush yourself off. Call yourself Sally and you’re in business.


    Ok, I am being slightly facetious. I don’t want any of those things to happen. But the reality is we are creating an environment that can make these atrocities not only easy to do, but probable. That’s very scary.

     

    So congratulations California, you have just given every curious hormonal teenager a free pass to ogle whatever they damn well please. You are a paving a path towards allowing the same for adults. By your own oversight, you cannot question them; that would be a violation of their rights. You cannot stop them, because you yourself have made that illegal. And worst of all, while you may have passed this law with good intentions, you have now put the feelings and wishes of a very select few above the rest of society. But that’s ok, because Todd might be feeling ‘oh so pretty’, come Monday.

     

    We really didn’t need this legislation; there was already a law in place. It’s the law of Mother Nature. It says:


    Assume the airplane crash position. With your head between your legs, lift up your skirt and have a look. Based on what you discover, go to the corresponding bathroom. End of discussion.

    What do you think of this story?

    Select one of the options below. Your feedback will help tell CNN producers what to do with this iReport. If you'd like, you can explain your choice in the comments below.
    Be and editor! Choose an option below:
      Awesome! Put this on TV! Almost! Needs work. This submission violates iReport's community guidelines.

    Comments

    Log in to comment

    iReport welcomes a lively discussion, so comments on iReports are not pre-screened before they post. See the iReport community guidelines for details about content that is not welcome on iReport.

    Add your Story Add your Story