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    Posted February 13, 2014 by
    WriteAsRain
    Location
    Marietta, Georgia
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Wintry weather 2014

    More from WriteAsRain

    Snowed-In Atlanta 2: Reflections of a New Father With Cold Issues

     

    CNN PRODUCER NOTE     WriteAsRain is considering moving to a warmer climate after his experience in the two snowstorms that have hit Atlanta this winter. In the last snowstorm, he was forced to abandon his car and run five miles home. This time, he and his family stayed put. As any husband or father would, he said, he was constantly checking the house, making sure that he and his family were prepared for the worst. "It is something done whether there is snow or not," he said. "But because there were [bad] weather conditions, there was more reason and more checking to do."
    - Verybecoming, CNN iReport producer

    About a week before the first Atlanta snow “incident,” I was telling my mother in a phone conversation how I have re-acclimated myself to cold weather. “It’s cool, I don’t even really notice.” My mother responded in disbelief . “You? Okay with the cold? I’m surprised,” she said. “Doesn’t bother me at all anymore.” Maybe I was trying to convince myself.

     

    You see, I am notorious in my family for hating the cold with a vengeance. I was born and raised in Nashville, TN where a deep scowl haunted my face even on summer mornings before the temp rose past 65 degrees. That being said, I really thought I had grown up and grown out of my serious disdain for cold weather. After ditching my car in the January 28th “Atlanta Snowpocalypse” and running home in the cold to complete my 7.5 hour trek, I still wasn’t quite sure. But now that we’re snowed in for a second time hoping the power stays on, there is very little doubt. The cold is not my friend.

     

    To complicate this temperature sensitivity further, my family recently moved back to Atlanta, GA from sunny Southern California of all places. I know, crazy right? I had not truly been festooned in cold weather for almost a decade. Aside from the occasional Big Bear, CA trip where we once hot-tubbed in a 17 degree blizzard with our LA friends, the cold had become somewhat foreign. Not anymore.

     

    In the midst of the second, evidently much more serious Atlanta weather “incident,” I find myself constantly checking on things around the house. Towels under doors, first aid supplies, impromptu indoor fire pit, flashlight batteries, locked doors, blankets, hand warmers, prepped food, and the other million things that now come naturally. I remember my father walking through the house in the middle of the night checking doors, keeping the fire hot in our wood-burning stove, making sure that everything was in good order. Hearing him rustling around here and there in the house well after midnight always made me feel safe.

     

    This night though, after all the “daddy-checking” has been done, as we wait for the power to falter, I’m sitting in our living room building my nightly sculpture out of wooden ABC learning blocks. The first thing our One-year-old does every morning is excitedly destroy the creation I built for him as he slept. I realize things could have been different. I could have been out of town for work. I could have been stuck in traffic overnight like many were during the first storm. But I’m not. Odyssey averted. I am very thankful to be right here with my wife and my son waiting for the cold to surrender.

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