Share this on:
 E-mail
2
VIEWS
0
COMMENTS
 
SHARES
About this iReport
  • Not vetted for CNN

  • Click to view omeroscar's profile
    Posted March 12, 2014 by
    omeroscar
    Location
    Manila

    More from omeroscar

    Philippines attaining Malaria-free status

     
    THE Philippine government on Wednesday announced that the country is on the way to eliminating malaria by 2020.
    At the 2014 Asia Pacific Malaria Elimination Network (APMEN) VI in Makati on Tuesday, the Philippines joins other countries in the region and shared its successes and challenges in malaria elimination, including its prepared plans.
    “We are pleased to welcome the Asia-Pacific Malaria Elimination Network (APMEN), a network of 14 Asia-Pacific countries working towards the elimination of malaria as a public health threat in each of our countries, as they hold their 6th annual meeting here,” Health Secretary Enrique Ona declared.
    The health chief noted that malaria cases in the country declined since the mid-2000s, and has resulted in an 83 percent reduction from 2005 to 2013, while there was a 92% reduction in the number of deaths within the same period.
    The number of cases went down from 46,342 cases in 2005 to 7,720 in 2013. Deaths were 150 in 2005 to 12 to last year. The Philippines has achieved the Millennium Development Goal target for 2015 as early as 2008.
    Of the 53 known provinces that are endemic for the disease, 27 have already been declared malaria-free.
    Malaria is a disease caused by parasite called Plasmodium. It is transmitted by the bite of a mosquito vector, Anopheles. The disease usually thrives in the rural and hard-to-reach areas such as in the hills, mountains and coastal areas. Disease transmission is perennial and generally higher during the rainy season.
    High-risk groups consist of upland subsistence farmers, forest workers, indigenous people and settlers in frontier areas, including migrant agricultural workers. Children under-five are also considered to be at high risk, including pregnant women.

    What do you think of this story?

    Select one of the options below. Your feedback will help tell CNN producers what to do with this iReport. If you'd like, you can explain your choice in the comments below.
    Be and editor! Choose an option below:
      Awesome! Put this on TV! Almost! Needs work. This submission violates iReport's community guidelines.

    Comments

    Log in to comment

    iReport welcomes a lively discussion, so comments on iReports are not pre-screened before they post. See the iReport community guidelines for details about content that is not welcome on iReport.

    Add your Story Add your Story