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  • Approved for CNN

  • Click to view DustyLane's profile
    Posted March 21, 2014 by
    DustyLane
    Location
    Nashville, Tennessee
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Ever want to be Batman?

    The Other Boy Who Loved Batman....

     

    CNN PRODUCER NOTE     DustyLane told me, 'I've spent years imagining myself in Batman's shoes. Thankfully I've never had to endure the same sort of tragedy that lead him to becoming what he is. However I can very much identify with a lot of the character traits he has, particularly in the darker renditions. The feelings of isolation and loneliness. Much like Bruce Wayne, I prefer to keep people at a distance and really have a hard time letting others get close to me. I spend a lot downtime deep in thought, and anyone who's ever read the post 1970s Batman comics regularly or watched a Batman film knows exactly what I'm talking about. He's also encouraged me to become a deep thinker, sharpen my wits, and truly believe in strong moral principles.'
    - hhanks, CNN iReport producer

    My name is Jonathan Dustin Lane. I'm 31 years old, born and raised in Nashville, TN. I've been a Batman fan almost my entire life. Batman is more than just a superhero or mere fictional character to me, it's almost akin to a religion. I my eyes he represents the pinnacle of human achievement. It's an inspirational idea of how we as human beings can take the worst of life's tragedies and turn it into something positive. Naturally in Bruce Wayne's case the death of his parents traumatized him greatly as it would anyone. However, rather then succumbing to the darkness of tragedy, he uses it as an instrument of good, thus making him stronger. Bruce Wayne will never completely win his one-man war on crime so long as there is evil in the world. Nevertheless, if he can make a difference in as many lives possible ensuring that other people do not have to endure the same horror he did as a child, then his quest does have meaning. Batman is an excellent role model. That doesn't mean you should put on a mask and be a vigilante, but the concept instills values of courage, righteousness, and justice.

    My first exposure to the character came in the mid 1980s' as a small child watching reruns of the 1966 television series starring Adam West. My parents would buy me the comic books at the local supermarket despite my not yet being able to read. By the time I was 6 years old came the 1989 Batman film directed by Tim Burton. That's where I truly became a "fan." The film launched a craze that was known as the second coming of "Batmania", a term used in the mid 60s' when the success of the television series first took off. There was everything available on the market from Batman action figures, clothing, lunch boxes, and cereal, and believe me, I had it all too. So many children however go through different phases of interest in life and rarely stick to just one thing. In my case it was different because Batman has never left me. While I was introduced by way of the 60s' version, interest peaked by the '89 film, the point of no return came in the form of Batman: The Animated Series debuting in the 1992. It encouraged me to go deeper into the world of Batman learning about as much of the rich history as I possibly could. In the past two decades I have amassed a huge collection of memorabilia honoring the Dark Knight Detective. To this day there is a constant debate as to what is the true version of the character. Many purists believe that it's meant to be a dark story only wishing to omit the campy satire of the 1960s'. Other also debate about which series of films has portrayed the most accurate take between the work of Tim Burton and the more recent Christopher Nolan. However my philosophy is very simple, it's all relevant. As long as an artist's work remains faithful to the origin of Bruce Wayne and what his ultimate mission is, Batman can be interpreted in a variety of ways. I mean honestly how many fictional characters have the sort of range that Batman has? You can find a place for him in almost any genre from drama, comedy, horror, sci-fi, etc. etc. You name a category and I can almost guarantee there's been a Batman story told that fits it. It's always been a personal goal of mine as a fan to educate new and old fans alike to appreciate all unique adapations. After all, it's the constant evolution of changes that's made this character a lasting staple in history and a pop-cultural icon.

    If you would like see more of my collection, please feel free to checkout my facebook page at:

    https://www.facebook.com/dusty.lane.16
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