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    Posted March 23, 2014 by
    kainourgios
    Location
    Taipei, Taiwan

    Taiwanese Police Cracked Down on Student Protest Violently

     

    Since March 18th, as a response to a controversial trade pact with China, Cross-Strait Agreement on Trade in Services, thousands of students have been protesting against the government.
    The protesters broke into the parliament of Taiwan (Legislative Yuan) on March 18th, and have since occupied the assembly hall.
    After five days, the government did not answer to its citizens’ questions regarding the problems about the contents and lack of scrutiny of the trade pact.
    At the afternoon of March 23rd, some of the students decided to also broke into the governing cabinet's office (Executive Yuan).
    Because of Sunday, the office was lightly secured, so the protesters went into the building successfully, however unarmed.
    At the midnight of Sunday, the government decided to remove the students from the building, and the actions were brutal.
    The unarmed students inside and around the Executive Yuan acted following the idea of civil disobedience, and hence did not fight back to the policemen and policewomen. On the contrary, the police first used their batons and shields to punch their victims violently, and at the latter stage, even beat and used water cannons on the protesters.
    Clearly the actions were beyond necessity; many were harmed heavily.
    It marked the most violent event took place in the island for decades.

     

    (All rights of the photos belong to their original contributors, not the writer of this report)

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