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    Posted March 31, 2014 by
    paulmartinDJ
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

    More from paulmartinDJ

    Here's what I think probably happened to flight 370 !

     

    First...my sincere condolences to all the loved ones, familes, friends and associates of flight 370...may your pains and sufferings soon be

    better ! As it appears no hope of finding 370 and it's passengers and crew now exist...at least reminisce the good times and memories of those aboard !

    I am as skepticle a journalist as most when iy comes to facts and "show me proof " but here's a few things to ponder on.


    These Avro Tudor IV passenger aircraft disappeared without trace en route to Bermuda and Jamaica, respectively. Star Tiger was lost on January 30, 1948 on a flight from the Azores to Bermuda. Star Ariel was lost on January 17, 1949, on a flight from Bermuda to Kingston, Jamaica. Neither aircraft gave out a distress call; in fact, their last messages were routine. A possible clue to their disappearance was found in the mountains of the Andes in 1998: the Star Dust, an Avro Lancastrian airliner run by the same airline, had disappeared on a flight from Buenos Aires, Argentina, to Santiago, Chile on August 2, 1947.

    On December 28, 1948, a Douglas DC-3 aircraft, number NC16002, disappeared while on a flight from San Juan, Puerto Rico, to Miami. No trace of the aircraft or the 32 people onboard was ever found. From the documentation compiled by the Civil Aeronautics Board investigation, a possible key to the plane's disappearance was found, but barely touched upon by the Triangle writers: the plane's batteries were inspected and found to be low on charge, but ordered back into the plane without a recharge by the pilot while in San Juan. Whether or not this led to complete electrical failure will never be known.

    US Navy TBF Grumman Avenger flight, similar to Flight 19. This photo had been used by various Triangle authors to illustrate Flight 19 itself. (US Navy)Main article: Flight 19 Flight 19 was a training flight of TBM Avenger bombers that went missing on December 5, 1945 while over the Atlantic.

    The impression is given that the flight encountered unusual phenomena and anomalous compass readings, and that the flight took place on a calm day under the leadership of an experienced pilot, Lt. Charles Carroll Taylor. Adding to the intrigue is that the Navy's report of the accident was ascribed to "causes or reasons unknown." It is believed that Charles Taylor's mother wanted to save Charles's reputation, so she made them write "reasons unknown" when actually Charles was 50 km NW from where he thought he was.


    On August 28, 1963 a pair of U.S. Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft collided and crashed into the Atlantic. The Triangle version (Winer, Berlitz, Gaddis) of this story specifies that they did collide and crash, but there were two distinct crash sites, separated by over 160 miles of water. However, Kusche's research showed that the unclassified version of the Air Force investigation report stated that the debris field defining the second "crash site" was examined by a search and rescue ship, and found to be a mass of seaweed and driftwood tangled in an old buoy. SS Marine Sulphur Queen

    According to media reports, at about 8:40pm local time, in the evening of July 7, 2010, in Hangzhou’s Xiaoshan Airport, China’s ninth-busiest, a UFO was reported by a flight crew that was preparing to land. As a precaution, flight controllers delayed or redirected eighteen flights. Another similar incident happened the next year, 2011, in Chongqing, China. The Shanghai Daily reported that a UFO was spotted one Wednesday afternoon in August floating high about Jiangbei International Airport in the city of Chongqing, an important aviation hub for southwestern China.

     

    I'm gonna go with the SKYJACK theory...that's my gut feeling...because experienced pilots would never have lost control and attempted such unprofessional and erratic maneuvers and it is unlikely short of a sudden explosion or bullets shattering windows causing instant decompression,etc that the aircraft would behave in such inconsistent ways !

    Assuming this is what happened either there was a struggle in the cockpit incapacitating the pilots or whoever attempted to control the flight had limited knowledge thus resulting in failure of whatever their intended mission was !

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