Share this on:
 E-mail
199
VIEWS
4
COMMENTS
 
SHARES
About this iReport
  • Approved for CNN

  • Click to view DeSpirit's profile
    Posted April 16, 2014 by
    DeSpirit
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Wildlife photography

    More from DeSpirit

    Wildlife Photography -- A True Passion & Ultimate Privilege

     

    Image Notes

     

    1)  "Missy" a very cool female leopard that I was able to photograph for over two hours in the Okavango Delta region of Northern Botswana.  We bonded and she would actually stop to pose for me.  I was mesmerized by her power, grace and sheer beauty.

    2)  Female kangaroo with her baby "joey" peeking out of her pouch in Kuranda Region, Queensland, Australia
    3)  Baby Macaque monkey nursing in the Pusuk Monkey Forest, Lombok, Indonesia
    4)  Lion cub sunning in a dry river bed, Kruger National Park, South Africa
    5)  Dragon Fly in the rain forest below Kuranda, Queensland, Australia
    6)  Male Zebra, Northern Botswana, Africa
    7)  Galapagos Hawk, Baltra Island, Galapagos Islands, Equador
    8)  Galapagos Giant Tortoise, Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos Islands, Equador
    9)  Leopard cub (thought to be "Missy's" cub, as he was found in the same area), Okavango Delta region of Northern Botswana, Africa
    10)  Twin Baby Giraffes, Manyeleti Game Reserve, South Africa

     

    Back Story

     

    For over 25 years, I have been drawn by the intrigue, excitement and ultimate privilege that comes with traveling to over 82 different countries (so far) and being able to photograph wildlife.  Every image has it's own distinctive story that speaks volumns.

     

    There is a unique humility that comes from the realization that we "humans" are sharing this planet with so many spectacular species of wildlife. I get such joy from capturing the images, but also, being able to share them around the world.

     

    It is my gift, to honor the wildlife in their habitat and know that those who may never actually get to see them in the wild, can experience them through my photography.

     

    First and foremost, the initial lesson that one learns is that most animals don't pose and seldom "smile on que". Secondly, you have to learn to be very, very patient (it could take hours, days or even years to get just the right shot).

     

    Or you might just get a fleeting second to take that award winning image and never have that opportunity again. Either way, wildlife is just that..."wild" and thus, is by nature (pun intended), always changing, moving and challenging us to learn more about their world.

     

    When you interface with wildlife, you may have to take 1000's of images and be willing to be very critical to insure that you have captured that very special "magical moment". As the eyes are the key to their soul, it is best if you can try to focus on that aspect and let the rest of the scene unfold in front of you.

     

    Watch, observe, learn their mannerisms, but most of all, take in the experience of your close encounter, be steady and let the camera be your eyes into a world that captures the imagination.

     

    Included in the above images, is a short collection from my extensive wildlife gallery. Featured are images from my travels in Botswana, South Africa, The Galapagos Islands, Indonesia, and Australia.

     

    Let your sense of adventure and curiosity be your guide to discovering the "magic" of how spectacular it is to photograph wildlife.

     

    All images were taken by Doug Mackenzie, Owner of Mackenzie Images -- mackenzie-images.com, facebook.com/mackenzieimages, Twitter: @mackenzieimages

    What do you think of this story?

    Select one of the options below. Your feedback will help tell CNN producers what to do with this iReport. If you'd like, you can explain your choice in the comments below.
    Be and editor! Choose an option below:
      Awesome! Put this on TV! Almost! Needs work. This submission violates iReport's community guidelines.

    Comments

    Log in to comment

    iReport welcomes a lively discussion, so comments on iReports are not pre-screened before they post. See the iReport community guidelines for details about content that is not welcome on iReport.

    Add your Story Add your Story