Share this on:
 E-mail
23
VIEWS
0
COMMENTS
 
SHARES
About this iReport
  • Not verified by CNN

  • Click to view Mlaurence's profile
    Posted April 25, 2014 by
    Mlaurence
    Location
    Georgetown, District of Columbia

    More from Mlaurence

    Viagra Might Increase the Risk of Skin Cancer

     
    The little blue pill that helps men with erectile dysfunction (ED) might be linked to increased chances of melanoma, the deadliest of all skin cancers. A study of nearly 26,000 men in the United States found that users were not at increased risk for other types of less-dangerous skin cancers. Sildenafil, commonly known as Viagra, might increase the risk of melanoma because it affects the same genetic pathway that allows the cancer to become more invasive.

    JAMA Internal Medicine published the study, which found that patients who took Viagra were 84 percent more likely to develop melanoma than patients who did not. The study began in 2000 and tracked participants through the years, first excluding men who reported having cancers at baseline. Participants’ average age was 65, and about six percent had taken Viagra at the beginning of the study. Melanoma risk for users was double that of non-users. The results did not change when the study was adjusted for a family history of cancer and other relevant factors such as ultraviolet light exposure.

    The report cautions that the results are insufficient to alter clinical recommendations. Dr. Dale Isaacson advises that men who are on the drug and have a high risk of developing melanoma should see their primary care provider to address any concerns.

    For more information about melanoma or other concerns, visit www.dcdermdocs.com

    What do you think of this story?

    Select one of the options below. Your feedback will help tell CNN producers what to do with this iReport. If you'd like, you can explain your choice in the comments below.
    Be and editor! Choose an option below:
      Awesome! Put this on TV! Almost! Needs work. This submission violates iReport's community guidelines.

    Comments

    Log in to comment

    iReport welcomes a lively discussion, so comments on iReports are not pre-screened before they post. See the iReport community guidelines for details about content that is not welcome on iReport.

    Add your Story Add your Story