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    Posted April 28, 2014 by
    WANews

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    Canada Continues Brutal Seal Slaughter

     
    With regal fur, dark wide eyes and irresistible blubber, it’s no wonder the harp seal is adored by millions around the world. Unfortunately the harp seal’s beautiful aesthetic is also its demise. Every year precious harp seals are bludgeoned, shot and clubbed to death while the Canadian government profits.

    After being hunted, the seal’s pelts are made into luxurious fur coats and other glamorous accessories. Because baby seal pelts are softer, they’re in higher demand than adult pelts, making the baby seal the central target during hunting season. Last year, over 90,318 harp seals were killed and what’s even more devastating than this is the fact that over 97% of these seals are between three weeks and three months of age. According to the Canadian government, the average age of a killed seal is only 25 days old.

    To say these precious seals die a painful death is an understatement. After being either shot or clubbed with hakapiks (metal hook tipped clubs) the harp seals are then brutally skinned for their fur. An Analysis by a panel of Veterinarians funded by IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare) confirmed in 2001 that 40% of seals were skinned while conscious, although the Canadian government propagandized otherwise.

    It doesn’t get much worse than that… Unless the seals bludgeoned bodies are disposed on top of one another, and left to die of suffocation. That is if they haven’t already died from the skull bashing or gunshot blows. At best the seal manages to escape after wounded, but even then the chances of survival are meek, as they frequently retreat to the ocean and die.

    Spokesman David Walters of Fisheries and Oceans Canada defends, “We remain committed to supporting jobs and growth, which includes the economic benefits to northern and coastal regions of the country provided by the sealing industry.” The truth is Canadian natives do not depend on seals for survival and these seals die a brutal inhumane death while the government profits.

    In 1972 the U.S banned the sale of seal fur in attempts to deter seal clubbing and unanimously passed U.S Senate Resolution 84, calling for an immediate end to the annual seal slaughter. In 2009 the E.U voted to end the sale of seal products and Taiwan, Mexico and Russia have permanently banned seal-fur imports. Although advances have been made, the Canadian government continues to find different ways to profit from the harp seals death, igniting the support of other countries and thus facilitating the practice.

    The Federal Fisheries Department has set a quota of 400,000 harp seals for 2014.

    Please help spread awareness to this brutality and contact the Canadian Government today urging them to stop seal hunting once and for all!

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