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    Posted April 30, 2014 by
    tablaaeiou
    Location
    Valley Center, California
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Breaking news

    Forget Wearables: Here Come the Invisibles

     
    Two men, Eric Owens and David Hayden, have started an Ergonomics Revolution with a revolutionary new input device with and amazingly simple ergonomic A.E.I.O.U. layout that is accessed through ergonomically grouped input regions located at the ends of the fingers instead of scattered all around like on the qwerty keyboard. David Hayden, the Tabla inventor, says the new ergonomic keyboard is being designed to be a do it all use it anywhere input device and eventually will replace thumb texting, the qwerty computer keyboard, television remote controls and gaming controllers.
    The keyboard can be slipped into the pocket and essentially becomes the word coined by Mr. Hayden, "invisible technology. The men are currently working to enhance and expand the keyboard, from a five finger toggle bowl multitouch experience into a virtual and keyboardless through motion sensitive technology. The goal is to play video games in the best most comfortable fashion. In a recliner with a split wireless control. One hand controls the A.E.I.O.U. input, and the other hand controls everything else. This keyboard promises to be the standard for gaming control even into the realm of virtual virtual reality.
    "The problem with starting a project like this is time and money," says Eric Owens, a full time experience programmer. "Once we have these two things the entire system can be built. Our goal is to
    have the product available to consumers by this Christmas." David Hayden, interrupts, "He talking about the virtual virtual internet."
    David Hayden is new on the scene, been around forever kind of inventor. He shakes his head when talking about the long grueling process of building the keyboard before the bluetooth wireless protocol. "I never wanted wires. The rise of the bluetooth wireless standard allowed the freedom of movement an ergonomic keyboard needs. ," David says with conviction. "This keyboard will be the research input standard. Forget video games, if you are doing underwater studies for instance, you would never think of using a cell phone, or a qwerty keyboard. The ease of use of this invention will allow people to enter data and communicate with texts in any kind of environment," interrupts the chief Tabla programmer. Mr. Hayden continues, "If the user has special needs, such as being blind, deaf, or an amputee, the system will adapt. My vision is to have Tabla A.E.I.O.U. as the standard of information input. In the near future eventually someone could be in a bad accident, wake up in the hospital, and immediately reach for a Tabla attached to a hospital bed and be able to call a nurse, adjust the bed, or log onto the internet."

    The Tabla project has launched on fundrazr and the entire project can be studied in detail at www.onehandtexting.com.

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