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    Posted May 1, 2014 by
    chbruce
    Location
    California
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

    More from chbruce

    Jack Warren San Diego Business Radio Personality | Flight 370 | An Aircraft Controllers Perspective

     
    I was an aircraft controller in that region. I was in the military during the Vietnam War. I controlled high-altitude aircraft at a center in Vietnam. A controller in that center could well have been the next person to talk to flight 370 had he not said "good night" to the controller in Malaysia.

    The way that the aircraft controller system works is that the last controller that talked to the flight is still responsible for the flight until he gets transferred over to another controller in a new center.

    What we don't hear anyone talking about is that the last controller did not appear to make any further attempts to contact Flight 370 on the emergency radio frequency.

    There are no stories about that controller contacting his supervisor and saying, "Sir, this aircraft is turning off course. It's making a left-hand turn off of the jet route."

    Every aircraft that files an IFR flight plan (Instrument Flight Rules) is not allowed to deviate from that fight plan unless the aircraft declares an emergency. It would be highly usual for that controller in Malaysia to fail to call his supervisor over and identify the aircraft that is making an inappropriate turn off of the jet route and not making an attempt to contact the controllers on the emergency radio frequency.

    At this point the controller in Malaysia should also have contacted the controller in Vietnam telling them that there is an aircraft, the one he was turning over to them, making an inappropriate turn off of the jet route

    I find that highly unusual that there are no stories in the media about these events that should have happened because these are all standard procedures when controlling aircraft.

    Following standard procedure the conversation that would take place, over a land line, to the controller that the airplane was being handed over to would sound something like, "(Malaysia) I have an aircraft coming to you, flight 370, it is on jet route XX and is at altitude XX. Let me know when you have radar contact."

    The next controller would respond "I see him.” Malaysia would respond, "OK, I'm turning him over to you.” Each controller then would give their initials. That conversation would be recorded.

    Where are those recorded conversations?

    This remains just another question in a long list of questions that may never be answered.

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