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    Posted May 11, 2014 by
    LyfeBlog
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    Philoso #21: To Handle Provocativeness (Part Two)

     

    The reason why I suggested anger and annoyance could be resolved: listen to the back story.
    http://candidnation.blogspot.com/2014/04/philoso-21-to-handle-provocativeness.html
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    Part one was about tactics, but part two is going to be about the what and why.

     

    Provocativeness is causing anger, strong annoyance and reactions (outbursting unnecessary ones).
    Handling that appears to be like a serpent following you and then once you handle it, you chop the serpents head off.
    "Metaphorically, of course" haha, my odd sense of humor.
    But provocativeness is just something that should make you laugh, easy to say but hard to do.
    Why? Because this idealism is only the misunderstanding or stupidity of someone, literally.

     

    A few days ago an acquaintance of mine and I got into a trivial and difficult fight.
    I was quite upset because most of the time I spent with this person, there was nothing but negativity and reactions that weren't thought out. It killed me that I could not be open and always hesitate what to say with this person.

     

    Trying to distance myself, that person was troubled why I would not be friendly. And I laughed that a person who was extremely provocative could think and ask such a question. #smh

     

    We argued and mostly everything was blamed on me. And the main topic was included in this one piece of cruciality: how that person was being completely provocative in how to handle what I was saying. That person was overaggressive and can be totally described as a bull charging with its head for no reason.

     

    As we argued, I stayed diplomatic and calm as possibly as I could be. Still, my effort to make the other person understand was useless.
    I was successful in doing my part but the other person was not, "#pretty depressing." Unsuccessful in the sense that she did not try to understand at least one thing I was saying! So what I did was I slapped one side of the face and caressed the other.

     

    Slap: to say all things out of frustration that you feel about the acquaintance.
    Caress: cherish the person by saying that what is wonderful on the whole and show "positivity."
    I learned that the argument did not benefit me in the sense that she did not improve in what the argument was about. But on the other hand, I learned that I was being honest and towards the right direction, plus admitting minor faults does not make you inferior.

     

    So readers to state the obvious,
    Use the tactics from part one
    understand completely what's going on
    know that there will be one right side
    if the other person does not comprehend anything at all, don't give up. Just say whatever you want to say, be positive, then leave with a SALAAM, NAMASTE, and with your head held up high.
    P.S: Remember to be a person that understands situations, it will be very helpful in sorting anything in life.

     

    - See more at: http://candidnation.blogspot.com/2014/04/philoso-21-to-handle-provocativeness.html#sthash.6Kr59x9T.dpuf

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