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    Posted May 16, 2014 by
    jordanlond91
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    London, United Kingdom

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    When Tate first opened its doors to the public in 1897 it had just one site, displaying a small collection of British artworks. Today Tate has four major sitesand the national collection of British art from 1500 to the present day and international modern and contemporary art, which includes nearly 70,000 artworks. A number of new developments are planned for Tate Modern, Tate Britain  and Tate St Ives to ensure the galleries continue to expand.

    Henry Tate

    In 1889 Henry Tate, an industrialist who had made his fortune as a sugar refiner, offered his collection of British art to the nation. There was no space for it in theNational Gallery and the creation of a new gallery dedicated to British art was seen as a worthwhile aim and the search for a suitable site began. This gallery would house not only Henry Tate’s gift but also the works of British artists from various other collections.

    Sir John Everett Millais, Bt, 'Ophelia' 1851-2

    Sir John Everett Millais, Bt Ophelia 1851-2 Oil on canvas support: 762 x 1118 mm frame: 1105 x 1458 x 145 mm Presented by Sir Henry Tate 1894

    View the main page for this artwork

           

    The gallery at Millbank, London

    In 1892 the site of a former prison, the Millbank Penitentiary, was chosen for the new National Gallery of British Art, which would be under the Directorship of the National Gallery at Trafalgar Square. The prison, used as the departure point for sending convicts to Australia, had been demolished in 1890.

    Sidney R.J. Smith was chosen as the architect for the new gallery. His design is the core building that we see today, a grand porticoed entranceway and central dome which resembles a temple. The statue of Britannia with a lion and a unicorn on top of the pediment at the Millbank entrance emphasised its function as a gallery of British art. The gallery opened its doors to the public in 1897, displaying 245 works in eight rooms from British artists dating back to 1790.

    Growth of the gallery

    Since its original opening, the Millbank site has had seven major buildingextensions. In its first 15 years the Millbank site more than doubled in size, including the addition of seven rooms designed by the architect W.H. Romaine-Walker and funded by the arts and antique dealer J.J.(Sir Joseph) Duveen, built to display the Turner Bequest.

    By 1917, the remit of the gallery changed. It was made responsible for the national collection of British art from 1500 to the present day and international modern and contemporary art Romaine-Walker was again commissioned to design the new Modern Foreign Galleries, which were funded by Joseph Duveen’s son, Lord Duveen. These opened in 1926 and a year later a series ofmurals by Rex Whistler were unveiled in the restaurant.

    Tate Gallery

    In 1932, the gallery officially adopted the name Tate Gallery, by which it had popularly been known as since its opening. Five years later the new Duveen Sculpture Galleries opened. Again funded by Lord Duveen and designed by Romaine-Walker and Gilbert Jenkins, these two 300 feet long barrel-vaulted galleries were the first public galleries in England designed specifically for the display of sculpture. By this point, electric lighting had also been installed in all the rooms enabling the gallery to stay open until 5pm whatever the weather.

    In 1955, Tate Gallery became wholly independent from the National Gallery and discussions began on an extension that would increase the its exhibition space. A major extension in the north-east corner, designed by Richard Llewelyn-Davies opened in 1979. In the same year, the gallery took over the adjacent disused military hospital, enabling the building of the new Clore Gallery, designed by Sir James Stirling and funded by the Clore Foundation. It opened in 1987 and went on to win a Royal Institute of British Architects award the following year.

    Tate Britain Millbank entrance from across the street

    Getting to Tate Modern

    Journey planner

    To find your quickest route to Tate Modern, use Transport for London’s Journey planner.

    By Tube

    The nearest London Underground stations to Tate Modern are:
    • Southwark (Jubilee Line, 600 metres approx.)
    • Blackfriars (District and Circle Line, 800 metres approx.) has now been reopened
    • St Pauls (Central Line, 1,100 metres approx.)
    If you are travelling by Car you will need to Pay Congestion Charge

    By bus

    The following buses stop near Tate Modern:
    • Routes 45, 63 and 100 stop on Blackfriars Bridge Road
    • Routes RV1 and 381 stop on Southwark Street
    • Route 344 stops on Southwark Bridge Road
    If you are travelling by Car you will need to Pay Congestion Charge The red spots on the map below show the location of these bus stops.

    By train

    The nearest mainline train stations to Tate Modern are:
    • Blackfriars (800 metres approx.)
    • London Bridge (1,100 metres approx.)
    If you are travelling by Car you will need to Pay Congestion Charge

    By boat

    Tate Boat runs every forty minutes along the Thames between Tate Britain and Tate Modern. Other river services run between Millbank Pier and Bankside Pier. If you are travelling by Car you will need to Pay Congestion Charge

    By bike

    The nearest Barclays Cycle Hire docking stations are located on New Globe Street and Southwark Street. If you are travelling by Car you will need to Pay Congestion Charge

    By taxi or Dial-a-Ride

    A drop off / pick up point is situated on Holland Street, just outside the main entrance. If you are travelling by Car you will need to Pay Congestion Charge

    By car

    There are no parking facilities at Tate Modern or in the surrounding streets. Public transport is the easiest way of getting to the gallery. Please note that if you are travelling via Car you will need to Pay Congestion Charge

    By coach

    A drop off / pick up point is situated on Southwark Street, a short walk from the main entrance.  

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