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    Posted May 29, 2014 by
    Liberty1955
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    Watertown, New York
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    Slavery's Capitalism - CEOs Are the New Plantation Owners

     
    "Capitalism is not just about the free market; it was also built on the backs of slaves who were literally the opposite of free."
    So you say, "How is that?"
    Aren't workers now paid for the work they do?
    Yes.
    But how much, for what amount of work and are workers doing the type of job they would choose to do, that they educated themselves to do, were they able to select the career that would satisfy them?
    It's not just the low wages that perpetuate the concept of slavery in America where people now work for little more than enough money to pay for basic shelter, utilities and food (and not much more).
    It's an attitude of entitlement as was demonstrated by L.A. Clipper's owner, Donald Sterling when he made disparaging remarks about minorities and the players who work for him.
    Sterling's basketball players are paid quite well.
    They can afford all the niceties.
    But when you look at the attitude of Sterling and many other owners and CEOs in our country, there's a distinct trait they all seem to have in common. Many believe that: "If it weren't for the owner class and CEOs, no worker would have anything".

    Sterling was recorded saying by a female friend that, "It bothers me a lot that you want to broadcast that you're associating with black people", and, "You can sleep with [black people].
    You can bring them in, you can do whatever you want", but "the little I ask you is ... not to bring them to my games."
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Sterling
    People seemed surprised by Sterling's remarks. Why?
    It's commonly understood that men like Sterling, believe that they 'own' their players along with the team.
    Many CEOs believe that employees are simply 'fixtures' that may be tossed to improve the bottom line.
    Outsourcing of American jobs to countries with few worker protections has become the rule rather than the exception. And all of this has been the complicit help by Congress who give everything to the rentier class and nothing to America's middle class and workers.
    A low 'Minimum wage', has become the new 'chains that shackle the workers'.
    The excuses the wealthy and CEOs of large companies use to justify their greed are self- serving. Their refusal to make concessions to workers shows them to be callous to the needs of the very people who they need to perform the duties and manufacture the products that make their companies or teams lots of money.

    An interesting analogy has been made by Caitlin Rosenthal who is a is the Newcomen Postdoctoral Fellow in Business History at Harvard Business School.

    She found in her research that: "southern plantation owners kept complex and meticulous records, measuring the productivity of their slaves and carefully monitoring their profits—often using even more sophisticated methods than manufacturers in the North.

    Several of the slave owners' practices, such as incentivizing workers (in this case, to get them to pick more cotton) and depreciating their worth through the years, are widely used in business management today."

    "The much bigger, more powerful question to ask is, If today we are using management techniques that were also used on slave plantations."
    "How much more careful do we need to be?
    How much more do we need to think about our responsibility to people?"
    Complete article at:
    http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/7182.html

    And why are we not paying workers a livable wage in the United States where slavery was ended (or was it) with our Civil War?
    Maybe we just renamed 'slavery' to 'capitalism' because it's more palatable.
    These days, 'capitalism', a nice euphemism, has come to be known by minimum wage workers as just another slavery.

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