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    Posted June 11, 2014 by
    k3vsDad
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    Cantor's Sin - Morality Tale for Hillary, Other Politicians?

     

    The  aftershocks keep rolling this afternoon throughout the American  political landscape. The epicenter is located in Washington DC and  hitting Republican elected officials where they live.

    Though  Virginia was the state feeling the impact initially when Professor Dave  Brat came out of nowhere to unseat the current Majority Leader of the  House of Representatives in his home district, the shock waves are being  felt coast to coast across the ocean to Hawaii and north through Canada  to Alaska.

    How could what was unthinkable happen?

    Eric Cantor was the second most powerful member of Congress.

    Cantor was a face that many across the nation identified as representative of the Tea Party.

    Cantor was even being named most likely heir apparent to Speaker of the House John Boehner.

    Many  are seeing Brat besting Cantor by more than 10 percentage points as a  surge of the Tea Party after several setbacks thus far this primary  season leading to the November Mid-Term Elections.

    Brat  did have some Tea Party support and did run to the right of Cantor on  immigration, but even the primary winner said he is not a Tea Party  member.

    Talking  heads, pundits, political analysts, pollsters are all trying to sort  out how a sitting #2 in the US House could lose his district - not to  the other party in a general election - but to a member of his own party  in a primary election of the faithful.

    Some  are trying to lay blame on the open primary system of Virginia claiming  it was Democrats crossing over which defeated the GOP's  second-in-command.

    I beg to differ in the opinions and perspectives of the chattering class.

    From  where I sit in the Cornfield as I look through the tiny stalks trying  to break through the ground and grow, it is very evident that Cantor  committed the sin whch has brought down politicians from time  immemorial.

    Cantor is guilty of the sin of presumption.

    He presumed he could not lose.

    He presumed he was invincible.

    He presumed the base, the electoral voters, would follow along and dutifully pull the lever beside his name.

    Cantor in the words made famous in so many other situations associated with celebrities and others, "believed his own press."

    On election day, Cantor was in the Capitol - not his home district until too late.

    Was he measuring the drapes or picking out furniture for the Speaker's office?

    Was he spending too much time raising money for candidates in other states at his own peril?

    Was Cantor talking to his constituents?

    Was Cantor listening to his constituents?

    Was Cantor in touch with his constituents?

    The answers are clear and in the result of last night's shocking upheaval in Virginia's 7th Dristrict.

    Brat was out in the district, making his case, rubbing shoulders and elbows with the people.

    Cantor,  on the other hand appears to have looked down from his tower and  thought of Brat as an ant to be squished - not the Jack the Giant  Killer, Brat actually was.

    Unlike  Thad Cochran who is in a struggle for his career in  Mississippi, Cantor did not spend the time and energy with his own  constituents to show them he appreciated them, was working for them and  wanted to represent them by actively campaigning in person.

    Virginians got tired of being taken for granted.

    Cochran  now must prove he is still the Senator from Mississippi - not the man  who went to Washington and forgot his roots and the people who put him  there.

    Or - Cochran could face the same fate as Cantor.

    This  brings me to the point that Cantor's sin of presumption may be a  morality or cautionary tale for Hillary Clinton and other politicians of  all stripes.

    Never presume the election is in the bag.

    Never presume you are still trusted and wanted by the people.

    Never presume money is enough to win an election.

    Never presume you are too important to boot out of office.

    Let's  look at the former First Lady, former Senator from New York, the former  Secretary of State and the presumptive heir to President Barack Obama -  Hillary Rodham Clinton, for a moment.

    In  2006, 2007 and early 2008, the buzz was that Clinton would be and had  the right to be the Democratic nominee to replace outgoing President  George W. Bush in the White House.

    All the talk was that Clinton could not lose.

    What happened?

    Out  from the prairie came the junior Senator from Illinois with no  experience to speak of and without putting time in the trenches. That  Senator upended the political wisdom of the time to usurp the Queen of  Democratic Politics and take the scepter of the Party of Jefferson and  catapult into the White House not once, but twice now.

    Spring forward to 2014.

    All the buzz is Hillary has paid her dues and is entitled to succeed Obama.

    All the talk is that Hillary cannot lose.

    From  the Cornfield, Mrs. Clinton and all elected officials take the strange  twist of fate that Eric Cantor did not survive after committing the sin  of presumption to be a morality tale for each of you.

    To do otherwise could be political suicide.

    Like it or not, the people can still speak when they want to and do the unexpected.

    Never let it be said you have pulled a Cantor.

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