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    Posted June 22, 2014 by
    dom01

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    Botox to Treat Headache?

     
    Headache remains one of the most common disorders of the nervous system but there is no sure-fire way to permanently rid of it, with people resorting to medication or expensive treatments.

    The large number of people suffering from headaches and their different reactions to various treatments has resulted in a host of new products and services meant to give relief, the latest being botox shots.



    The Times of India reported that the trend has now reached Chennai city with women lining up at hospitals for the unlikely treatment. It said studies have proven that the shots are able to provide relief from migraine for three to six months.

    It quoted Fortis Malar Hospitals’ Dr. Sathish Kumar, a neurologist, who said 12 out of the 25 people he meets complaining from migraine are from the IT industry and are considering botox as an option.

    "Though chronic migraine cannot be cured permanently, OnaBotulinum toxin typeA can significantly decrease the severity and frequency of migraine attacks," he said.

    According to the article, the shots are matches with the nerve points on the scalp, with at least 150 units of botox injected for headache relief lasting six months.

    A number of treatment clinics in the United States have also been offering botox injections for migraine relief.

    However, Apollo Hospitals’ consultant neurologist Dr. Vikash Agarwal told The Times of India that while it provides relief for chronic migraine, it “should never be the first leg of treatment.”

    “It is not a cure, but an option for interim relief. It should be prescribed only when conventional methods of treatment fail. Excess amounts of botox could cause weakness of facial muscles," he said.

    According to the World Health Organization, 47 percent of people around the world had experienced headache in the last 12 months. More than 10 percent of adults reported suffering from migraine.

    Fortunately, there are less invasive or drastic procedures and treatments available in the market.

    One such product is the Thermal-Aid Headache Relief System by Pacific Shore Holdings, Inc. (PSHR).

    Unlike other cooling and heating packs sold in the US, Thermal-Aid is made from natural materials that will not burn the skin. The kit includes a headache relief cream and a special pad made from terrycloth cotton and processed corn kernel that is able to hold temperatures for long periods of time.

    The “specialized corn” is created through a unique process that removes the germ from the kernel, resulting in the removal of moist that allows mold and fungi to form. The process hardens and extends the life of the corn, in addition to allowing it to retain both hot and cold temperature. The small pieces are then sewn into the terrycloth.

    The Thermal-Aid pad, designed by a Board-certified neurologist, is placed over the eyes while the cream is spread over the temples and forehead to cause immediate relief. The cream services as a topical analgesic and pain reliever.

    The World Health Organization said it is important for people to be more aware of headaches and how to treat it, especially since it becomes a burden to their life and the rest of society.

    Natural and environment-friendly products like Thermal-Aid allow safe and immediate relief for headaches, as well as other bodily pains.

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