Share this on:
 E-mail
12
VIEWS
0
COMMENTS
 
SHARES
About this iReport
  • Not vetted for CNN

  • Click to view josh231's profile
    Posted June 22, 2014 by
    josh231
    Location
    United States

    More from josh231

    Preparing For An In Office Surgical Anesthesia And Operation

     

    Many doctors and other medical practitioners now prefer to administer certain types of surgeries in their clinics or offices instead of having these done in hospitals. And many patients are also agreeing and open to this modern and new setting.
    Some of the most common type of surgeries that patients can undergo inside their doctor’s clinic or office includes oral, vascular, ophthalmology, pain management, radiology, laser surgery plastic surgery, and other general surgeries.

    All these types of surgeries require a patient to receive anesthesia. And before you start thinking that since anesthesia is required, you may as well opt to undergo such surgeries in a hospital since it is safer and more “traditional”. After all, this is your health and life being talked about here and you wouldn’t want to risk it because your doctor prefers to follow modern and contemporary health and medical practices.

     

    In-Office Surgical Anesthesia

     

    In office surgical anesthesia, usually also called ambulatory anesthesia, refers to the specialized process of administering anesthesia, analgesia or sedation to a patient who will undergo an operation in a location other than a hospital, such as the doctor’s clinic or office, a diagnostic center and even in an ambulatory surgical center. The goal of any in-office anesthesia administration and surgery is for the patient to stay less than 24 hours in the clinic or office of the doctor and thereby helping the patient to achieve full recovery from the operation faster.

     

    What You Need To Do Before Undergoing An Office Based Anesthesia And Surgery

     

    Any surgery, whether it is a minor or major one and whether this will be administered in a hospital or in your doctor’s clinic, requires certain preparations.

     

    Once you get all the facts and assurances you need and you fully agree to receive or undergo an office based anesthesia and surgery, below are some ways you can follow to prepare well for both procedures:

     

    • Get to know the anesthesiologist your doctor would be working with. You already know a lot about your doctor and feel comfortable working with him or her. Now, it’s time to know about the anesthesiologist. Ask your doctor about all the details you need to know about this specialist: his or her years of relevant experience, how long your doctor has known the anesthesiologist and how many times they have worked before already.
    • Prior to the operation, you will undergo a preoperative evaluation which will be conducted by the anesthesiologist. This is the best time for you to ask more about the credentials and experiences of the anesthesiologist. You also need to tell the anesthesiologist your complete medical history so that these will be factored in during the surgery.
    • Follow all the instructions given to you before the surgery. You may be asked to fast or to not take in any medication the night before the operations. You need to completely follow these to avoid any complication from happening during the surgery.

     

    Undergoing in-office surgeries and anesthesia is already considered a safe and accepted medical procedure or setting. But if you want to know more about office based surgeries and anesthesia, click on this site.

    What do you think of this story?

    Select one of the options below. Your feedback will help tell CNN producers what to do with this iReport. If you'd like, you can explain your choice in the comments below.
    Be and editor! Choose an option below:
      Awesome! Put this on TV! Almost! Needs work. This submission violates iReport's community guidelines.

    Comments

    Log in to comment

    iReport welcomes a lively discussion, so comments on iReports are not pre-screened before they post. See the iReport community guidelines for details about content that is not welcome on iReport.

    Add your Story Add your Story