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    Posted July 2, 2014 by
    jessgeorgia
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    North Carolina
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    Appalachian Trail You Win And I QUIT!

     

    Appalachian Trail You Win And I QUIT!

     

    I wanted to switch things up a little bit for this post. I am not quitting, just wanted to bring my point home in this post about how many people do in fact, quit. And for good reason.

     

    If you have not heard I have been wandering around on the Appalachian trail this summer. It has been quite the experience so far.

     

    Learning to pee in a privy with some questionable “walls”….

     

    Having our tent literally flood during a down pour in the middle of the night…

     

    Dealing with the physical aches and pains of backpacking…

     

    Mentally battling with yourself while trying to sleep in the very creepy dark woods at night that someone is not going to murder you…or that a bear will find you and make you a midnight snack…

     

    Super creepy at night. That fog behind the tents is a drop off and all mountains. Who the heck knows what is lurking in that?!? The mind will take you to some crazy places at night. I now know why horror novelists always go “off grid” deep in woods to write there books.

     

    Ya know, it’s a totally typical and glamorous “summer vacation!”

     

    All my posts about the trail so far have been pretty positive. But there is a lot of lows and highs to this experience.

     

    I have had multiple days using choice words to tell my husband and I quote, ”To go F himself I am moving as fast as I can up this big ass hill!”

     

    Not my most beautiful moment!!

     

    But the reality is that while hiking the Appalachian Trail for the summer sounds incredible, and don’t get me wrong, it is. You are still going to have some struggles and not so incredible experiences.

     

    A lot of my Facebook and social media postings are, “WOOT, look at this fabulous view we get to lounge around looking at for the remainder of the day!! It’s amazing.”

     

    What you DO NOT see is the blood, sweat, and cursing to get to the top of that mountain. The very not pleasant moments. Sure, I could post the negative moments all over my social media, but why? To have people say, “Ha, I knew she could not make it. I knew it was too hard. See, this is why I don’t do these un realistic things.”

     

    Negative breeds more negative.

     

    I would rather keep the negative moments to myself. This way I don’t discourage someone with my issues and challenges. I personally would rather inspire one person to think, “That looks absolutely incredible and if Jess can do it, I can do it!”

     

    At the same time I want to voice the fact that anything great in life will always come with personal struggle attached to it.

     

    That really hit home for me while hiking the “McAfee Knob/Tinker Hill” section of the trial. Within a very short distance you are backpacking up a difference of something like a 1700 ft elevation change.

     

    Up incredible steep inclines…in 80 degree dry heat sweating profusely…with a 30lb backpack on your back.

     

    I don’t care who you are. You are going to curse at least once and think about quitting!! And if you don’t, you are my hero, seriously.

     

    But let me tell you this…

     

    That 360 view at the top is heart stopping, jaw dropping and awe inspiring. If these views don’t trigger some sort of emotion out of you….Honestly, I don’t even know what that means for you!! That is just crazy!

     

    >>>Side Note This Image Could Use Your Votes To Win A Feature In “Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine”

     

    >>>>To Help Please go here: http://www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/instagram-contest-2/

     

    And Cast Your Vote For McAfee Knob By @Jessicageorgia. Thank You!<<<

     

    My point is only a small percentage ever hike to the top. Matter a fact only 4% of the thousands that head out to hike the entire Appalachian Trail each year actually 100% complete it (2,100 miles and 14 states).

     

    Only a small percent of people ever see the greatness in the world because they realize you cannot have the great without some shit to get to it. And they do not spread that “shit” around like a negative breeding disease. They suck it up and get through it.

     

    They curse.

     

    They cry.

     

    They quite for a minute and then decided to keep going.

     

    They do whatever they personally need to do in order to get to the “great.”

     

    I have decided they are not “super human.” They are just extremely mentally strong people that are willing to deal with a little bit of crap to experience the great.

     

    The struggle is what helps you to appreciate the view at the top. To humble you before you can have it all. To remind you that you can, and will, if you are willing to fight thought the “crap”.

     

    I am sure I will face more challenges along this trip and I would not take away any of the struggle. I appreciate the lows just as much if not more then I do the highs. But the negative I promise not to spread just the light to encourage others.

     

    Much Love,

     

    Jess

     

    P.S. I will be updating here regularly from the trail, to keep you informed on the good, the bad, and the ugly! If you are interested in keeping up with me (and maybe seeing some popped blisters), subscribe in the header at www.jessicageorgia.biz

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