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  • Approved for CNN

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    Posted July 7, 2014 by
    adeleraemer
    Location
    Eshkol Region, Israel
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Israel-Gaza conflict

    More from adeleraemer

    The Price of Violence

     

    CNN PRODUCER NOTE     adeleraemer has lived in Israel near the Gaza border since 1975. She captured these photos after rocket strikes on July 7, and says her kibbutz is evacuating anyone who wants to leave the area. (She's going to stay, as she doesn't want to leave her dogs.) Read more about the conflict between Israel and Gaza on CNN.com.
    - rachel8, CNN iReport producer

    “See what a scourge is laid upon your hate,
    That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love;
    And I, for winking at your discords too,
    Have lost a brace of kinsmen: all are punish’d.”
    ~William Shakespeare, from Romeo and Juliet Act V, Scene III.

     

    Three Jewish boys kidnapped and murdered by Palestinian extremists.

     

    A Palestinian teen burnt alive by Jewish extremists.

     

    Animals, all of those perpetrators. Blood is blood.
    Murder is murder. These animals are destroying lives, families, endangering thousands, pummeling hope to a bloody pulp. Extremists on all sides are calling for revenge and retaliation, despite the fact that the families of all four boys are begging everyone around to stop the violence.

     

    I have been sleeping in my safe room (a specially reinforced room in Israeli houses designed to allow civilians to survive anything but a direct hit by mortars and rockets fired by Palestinians) all the past week. I am “lucky” – I live on my own, have no small children to worry about. It’s just me and my dogs – so WE get the saferoom.

     

    This morning, instead of being woken by my alarm clock, I was aroused by a wall-rattling explosion. 7 a.m. The time when people are taking their young ones to the day care centers on our kibbutz. The time when others are getting into their cars to go to work. Usually, we have about 10 seconds’ warning before a rocket fired at us from Gaza hits and explodes. Personally, I did not hear the warning this morning, but those who did said that it came less than 5 seconds before the rocket blast.

     

    Once I realized that it was actually inside my kibbutz, and WHERE it was, I called my son, since it was not far from his apartment. After verifying that he was fine I went about my morning chores. In real life I am NOT a reporter – running to the scene of disasters, putting my life in danger. I am actually an English teacher and trainer of other teachers who, despite this being school summer vacation, has a training course to work on and a ton of other tasks that need to be done.

     

    I was so rattled by the events that at last I realized I would not be able to concentrate on any of my work until I wrote an iReport – for although I was not actually an “eye-witness”, I was certainly an “ear-witness”. So out I went to the scene of the rocket explosion (just a few hundred yards from my house). As it happens, it blew up in my friend’s garden. His daughter was sleeping in the room next to where it detonated. The outer wall of the house absorbed the shrapnel and thank God no one in the house was injured. His only serious “casualty” was the new car he had been saving up to buy for so long (and finally did two weeks ago), together with several other cars parked near-by as well as the shrapnel holes in his wall.

     

    Imagine what that shrapnel does to a person’s body.

     

    One person was "lightly" wounded, just as they were running for cover in the shelter, a bit of shrapnel caught him in his back. (Albeit defined as "lightly wounded"...but can you imagine how that hurts?!) His friends assured me that he will be fine.

     

    To where will all this lead? When and how will it all end? I am convinced that it will not end until we talk to each other….. and listen well to each other.

     

    To finish off with another quote of wisdom:
    “An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth leaves us all blind and toothless.” (Attributed to Mahatma Ghandi, and Martin Luther King Jr. We could sure use one of them here in the Middle East these days)

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