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    Posted July 16, 2014 by
    SirEctor1967
    Location
    springfield, Oregon
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    The written word: Your personal essays

    Scariest day of my life

     
    It was the most chilling thing I had ever heard...

    "EMILY, SOMETHING IS WRONG WITH EMILY!!!"

    My morning had started out like any before it, I set out to work around seven, got my assignments for the day. My wife usually calls when she wakes up to tell me the routine good morning and I love you, except for today.

    "EMILY, SOMETHING IS WRONG WITH EMILY!!!"

    My wife screamed into my ear through the phone.
    I froze with horror.

    "My little girl, not my little girl." I thought to myself.

    "WHA--WHAT HAPPENED WHAT'S GOING ON!!!"

    I responded in shear panic. My body was still locked like a statue, unaware of anything else in the world but the sounds from my phone.

    "I DON'T KNOW SHE...SHE WAS SHAKING...AND I PICKED HER UP...SHE WAS LIMP LIKE SHE WAS DEAD!!! SHE'S BLUE!!!"

    She started to cry.

    I know in these moments it is best to stay calm, but I was just told my two year old daughter might be dead or dying.

    Freak out commenced.

    "WHAT! WHAT! DID YOU CALL 911!!!"

    I screamed into the receiver.

    The people around me started to watch me with more curiosity than concern.

    "I'M DRIVING TO THE HOSPI...LIZZY!...KEEP SHAKING YOUR SISTER! DO NOT LET HER FALL ASLEEP!!!"

    She barked at our seven year old.

    "HOSPITAL!!! WHAT HOSPITAL?!!!"

    As I asked her this, my body instantly started to automaticly jog toward the front of the building.

    "RIVERBEND!!!"

    She replied sobbing.

    "Just...just stay calm and drive safe...I will be right there!"

    I actually surprised myself at how composed I instantly became. My rational part of my brain had finally gotten over the shock, and told me that if she doesn't stay calm she will never make it to the hospital.
    I hung up my phone, and broke into a flat sprint. I flew past my boss on my way out, only managing two words,

    "MY DAUGHTER!!!"

    My boss didn't even attempt to stop me, as I exited the facility and ran for my car huffing air. My rationality must had been beaten into submission, because I was lost as to where I had parked. I have parked in the same place the last three years.

    While driving, a thousand things ran through my head, I don't know how I could get past my little girl dying. I don't know if I would ever forgive myself, I should have been there.

    Not following my own advise of course, I was so distracted by the waves of panicked thoughts and nightmarish visions that I almost got into a wreck myself.
    I began to cry uncontrollably. I became focused on solely reaching my destination, my little girls side.

    To my overwhelming relief, Emily, my daughter was awake, and alert, being held by my wife.

    I began to cry again.
    I wrapped my arms around my wife and little girl. My wife joined me sobbing.

    "They said it was a febrile seizure...and she is okay."

    I cried harder. But it was because the tremendous weight, the despair and anguish I had felt minutes before, was lifted.

    "They said it was because of a fever spike, and we just need to be careful when she is sick." My wife said wiping her eyes.

    This was the day, I really felt like a father.

    I spoke with the doctor and it happens to one in twenty five children with high fever of 102 degrees. The child will seize for two minutes or less, they will turn blue from no oxygen, and be limp and unresponsive for a minute or so. Their breathing normalizes, vomit, and be very sleepy after. Children usually out grow febrile seizures and they typically have no link to epilepsy. As long as the seizures don't last longer than five minutes there is no brain damage.

    I am not only writing this to share my emotions, but to educate young or future parents of something my wife and I knew nothing about before this. My wife however, is still mentally affected by these events, I can only imagine what it felt like in her shoes that day.

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