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    Posted July 24, 2014 by
    Mizzuri

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    Solar storm nearly destroyed Earth two years ago

     
    TWO years ago we were all going about our daily business blissfully unaware that our planet almost plunged into global catastrophe.

    A recent revelation by NASA explains how on July 23, 2012 Earth had a near miss with a solar flare, or Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), from the most powerful solar storm on the sun in over 150 years, but nobody decided to mention it.
    Err, what? Well that’s a sobering bit of news.

    “If it had hit, we would still be picking up the pieces,” says Daniel Baker of the University of Colorado.

    COULD A GIANT SOLAR FLARE CAUSE A CATASTROPHE ON EARTH?

    We managed to just avoid the event through lucky timing as the sun’s aim narrowly turned away from Earth. Had it occurred a week earlier when it WAS pointing at us the result could have been frighteningly different.

    Click this - http://resources2.news.com.au/images/2014/07/25/1227001/399234-68726326-139d-11e4-bbaf-47cb7c4f86b3.jpg

    Information for above link: (That purple arc billowing north west in this model shows how big the CME was and how we just dodged it. Source: NASA Source: Supplied)

    “I have come away from our recent studies more convinced than ever that Earth and its inhabitants were incredibly fortunate that the 2012 eruption happened when it did,” says Baker. “If the eruption had occurred only one week earlier, Earth would have been in the line of fire.

    The power of this ejection would have raced across space to knock us back to the dark ages. It’s believed a direct CME hit would have the potential to wipe out communication networks, GPS, and electrical grids to cause widespread blackout. The article goes on to say it would disable “everything that plugs into a wall socket. Most people wouldn’t even be able to flush their toilet because urban water supplies largely rely on electric pumps.”

    Just ten minutes without electricity, internet or communication across the globe is a scary thought and the effects of this event could last years. It would be chaos and disaster on an epic scale.

    “According to a study by the National Academy of Sciences, the total economic impact could exceed $2 trillion or 20 times greater than the costs of a Hurricane Katrina. Multi-ton transformers damaged by such a storm might take years to repair.”

    So can all breathe a worldwide sigh of relief? Well, not quite. Physicist Pete Riley, who published a paper entitled “On the probability of occurrence of extreme space weather events” has calculated the odds of a solar storm strong enough to disrupt our lives in the next ten years is 12 per cent.

    “Initially, I was quite surprised that the odds were so high, but the statistics appear to be correct,” says Riley. “It is a sobering figure.”

    However, the CME that almost battered us was a bit of a freak occurrence as it was actually two ejections within 10 minutes of each other, plus a previous CME had happened four days earlier to effectively clear the path.
    Sleep well, everyone.
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