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    Posted August 7, 2014 by
    KMFDallas
    Location
    Dallas, Texas

    More from KMFDallas

    A DES Mother's, DES Daughter's And DES Grandson’s Story

     

    I am a DES Daughter and my mother took DES through more than one pregnancy. My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1952, two years after I was born, and after numerous surgeries she died in 1959; at that time treatment was surgical, radiation and removal of the pituitary to slow the cancer growth. I do not know what version of DES she took, as my understanding is that the hospital records in NY were burned during a fire, but my late father told me she took DES at least twice and maybe more. I was the only live birth. Although my Dad was insistent I be checked for DES issues, as he knew of the cervical cancers in teenage DES daughters, he never told me, if he knew, which I assume he did, which brand of DES she took..

     

    Being a DES Daughter, I was fortunate to have a son. However, my son was born with extreme hypospadias (worst degree possible), and undescended testicles. It turned out one of his testicles was up by his kidney so it was removed at a young age for fear it would become cancerous. He subsequently developed testicular cancer in the other one in his 20's. It was removed (no live sperm remained) and he was given radiation treatment.

    There is no accurate account as to how many DES Grandsons are in the United States, but they too may be at risk for testicular cancer and/or other reproductive conditions. We are still learning more about what effects are occurring in the Third Generation of The DES Tragedy.

     

    The DES Tragedy is one felt around the world. More research is needed for DES Children and Grandchildren. It is DES Info’s mission to keep the story alive and to continue to push for research and more answers as to what healthcare needed to DES exposed continue to need along with health screenings.

     

    The DES Tragedy is not over and the DES exposed are still awaiting an apology!

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