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    Posted February 24, 2009 by
    AlunHill
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    Worldwide
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Tech talk

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    Gmail Fails

     
    UPDATE: Statement recieved from Google: The Gmail outage that affected many consumers and Google Apps users worldwide is now over. Users should find that they’re able to access their email now without any further problems. Before you can access your Gmail, you may be asked to fill in what’s called a ‘CAPTCHA’ which asks you to type in a word or some letters before you can proceed. This is perfectly normal when you repeatedly request access to your email account, so please do go through the extra step – it’s just to verify you are who you say you are. The outage itself lasted approximately two and a half hours from 9.30am GMT. We know that for many of you this disrupted your working day. We’re really sorry about this, and we did do everything to restore access as soon as we could. Our priority was to get you back up and running. Our engineers are still investigating the root cause of the problem. Obviously we’re never happy when outages occur, but we would like to stress that this is an unusual occurrence. We know how important Gmail is to you, and how much people rely on the service. Thanks again for bearing with us. Posted by Acacio Cruz, Gmail Site Reliability Manager UPDATE: gmail was down worldwide for almost 3 hours. UPDATE: At last, Google can send emails. They say: 2/24/2009* Many of our users had difficulty accessing Gmail today. The problem is now resolved and users have had access restored. We know how important Gmail is to our users, so we take issues like this very seriously, and we apologize for the inconvenience.
    No reason given, yet, though. My Gmail is back, but a bit slow.
    UPDATE: Just had an idea. Could someone at Google just turn it off and on again. Works for me. UPDATE: Google admits to 1 million business users - who each pay $50 for use of the Gmail service. GOOGLE: Google says gmail is usually unavailable for 10 to 15 minutes each month. This has now been 2 hours. UPDATE: Unknown twitterrer suggests: "Let's count the cost: 25m users, 33% affected; average of $50 per hour lost productivity = $415m per hour economic cost..." ... and this will increase to full 113 million users as USA starts its' day...... so looking at $2 billion per hour. Shareholders going to be a'panicking? UPDATE: Google press and PR in America still in bed - Google London say unable to email updates to press as their email is down. Well, yes .... Don't know whether to laugh or cry ... UPDATE: This gets worse. Amongst the 113 million users of Gmail (known as Googlemail in some countries) are many businesses, large and small, who use it exclusively. These include many newspapers who are unable to send or receive email. Still no update from Google. UPDATE: Service has now been down for 90 minutes - and no updated news from Google. This must be most embarrassing for them - but their PR teams should be on call 24/7 to apologise and explain, surely? What do you think? UPDATE: Some users of Android phones ("the Google cell phone") are reporting that they are able to access gmail. It will be interesting to see the affect on Google's shares when the markets open later this morning - especialy if it's not fixed by then. UPDATE: 113 million people and companies unable to access mail, worldwide. Gmail, also known as Googlemail. has failed, giving just an error message. iReporter Alun Hill sends Google this message - noting this is their 2nd major problem this month. Alun Hill, MCIJ UPDATE: at http://mail.google.com/support/ Google says: "We're aware of a problem with Gmail affecting a number of users. This problem occurred at approximately 1.30AM Pacific Time. We're working hard to resolve this problem and will post updates as we have them. We apologize for any inconvenience that this has caused. " I note there's no time scheduled for it to come back, which must mean a major problem.
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