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    Posted March 18, 2011 by
    christinaras
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Recovery in Japan: After the earthquake

    christinaras and 14 other iReporters contributed to Open Story: Earthquake strikes Japan
    More from christinaras

    TOKYO: almost a Ghost Town

     

    CNN PRODUCER NOTE     christinaras, 23, lives in Saitama -- one hour by train from Tokyo -- and says she would like to go home to the Philippines but the price of plane tickets has doubled. Classes at her school in Tokyo have been postponed until April. 'It's very hard ... you don't do much, and you have to always anticipate the aftershocks, and when the aftershock is happening, you don't know if it's going to get stronger. And then, the nuclear power plant, the radiation ... I am frightened, but it's hard to just go home.'
    - dsashin, CNN iReport producer

    March 18, 2011

     

    "an anxiety-ridden tokyo: an unusual aura of silence looming over the metropolis"

     

    Just a week after the world`s 5th strongest Earthquake to date occurred  followed by a Tsunami (Sendai,Miyagi and Fukushima), Tokyo which is the capital and the bussiest city in Japan becomes ghost town. Since Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant`s leakage haven`t been resolve yet, the governement decided to conserve electricity by having blackouts in various areas and limited time for stores, restaurants and other establishments around Japan.

     

    Even all the train station has limited time of operation and do not use much of electricity for heater and lights. Since the panic-buying and outage of such necessities, blackouts, on-going aftershocks and conserving of electricity have began, Japan seems to be paralyzed.

     

    * People were just at their homes or a few go at very nearby places only

    *Some people doesn`t have work yet

    *Some people esp. foreigners have gone to their respective countries

    *Schools here only run half-days

    *On-going panic buying

    *On-going aftershocks

    *Blackouts

    *Uncertain condition of the Fukushima Nuclear Plant

    *Limited time and use of electricity everywhere

    *No cars rounding aroun the streets

     

    In photos: You could see large streets, crossroads, intersections and stores with people you can even only  count on your fingers. The once lively, famous, bright-lights shopping center and busy town known as Tokyo seems to be abandoned for a while.

     

    On a lighter note, people seems to be living normal taking the recovery with optimism. I could see some smile, laughs and talks like saying `we`re still alive`.

    More love and prayers for Japan. The `the Land of the Rising sun` will soon be revived.

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