Share this on:
 E-mail
942
VIEWS
10
COMMENTS
 
SHARES
About this iReport
  • Not verified by CNN

  • Click to view Ithiel's profile
    Posted December 27, 2011 by
    Ithiel
    Location
    Vancouver, British Columbia

    More from Ithiel

    King Solomon Reincarnated as Jesus? (Prt 1 of 2)

     

    Reincarnation is a concept that originated five thousand years ago in India. The earliest religion to believe in the transmigration of the soul is Hinduism. King Cyrus the Great in the sixth century BCE named the inhabitants of northern India Hindus after the Indus River and may have had some influence on this religion. The Hindu religion defines reincarnation as: the perfecting of the soul through numerous rebirths, at the moment of perfection the soul reunites with its Source2. Although it is the Hindu religion that first describes this term, many sects within other religions also concede to this idea including Kabbalists in Judaism.

    1000- 930 BCE

    In the year 1000 BCE King David conquered the city of Jerusalem, overtaking the Jebusites by sneaking into the fortified city through a water conduit. David called it the City of David, but it would be known primarily by its historical name Yerushalayim- The city of Peace. Jerusalem seems to be first mentioned on sherds of pottery bought in Luxor in 1925 CE. When the sherds were reassembled they formed eighty vases and dishes with names of countries, towns and rulers that were evidently enemies of Egypt. The writing was of an ancient hieratic script and the vases were dated to the reign of Pharaoh Sesostris III who ruled Egypt from 1878- 1842 BCE. The Vases and dishes were first inscribed with the names and then smashed in a rite of ‘sympathetic magic’ 3. The idea was to curse the enemies of Egypt so that the locations and their rulers/ armies would be smashed literally just as they had been smashed figuratively (p. 6 Jerusalem). One of the names on the pottery was that of “Rushalimum” which is translated in Karen Armstrong’s book, Jerusalem One city three faiths, 1996-97 as “Shalem has founded” or Peace has founded4.

     

    2. Jayaram V. “Hinduism and the Belief in Rebirth.” Hindu Website
    http://www.hinduwebsite.com/reincarnation.asp
    3. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p. 6.
    4. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p. 7- Rushalimum is the Canaanite translation of the Hebrew name Yerushalayim; English is Jerusalem. Shalem and Salem are Hebrew for Peace and Completeness.

    Armstrong notes that the city of Jerusalem “seems to have incorporated the name of the Syrian god Shalem, who was identified with the setting sun or the evening star5” (Armstrong p. 7). Since King David and proceeding Hebrew monarchs retained this ancient name through to modern times Armstrong suggests that Syria had been Canaan’s (Retinu’s) “chief influence”. The Hebrew Bible agrees that Jerusalem or some variation of that name had been in use since ancient times6 (Shalem = Salem).

    Genesis 14:18 And King Melchizedek of Salem brought out bread and wine; he was the priest of the God Most High 7.

    After King David took control of Jerusalem, his prophet Nathan approached him with a message from the God Shalem that would forever change the monotheistic religion, perpetuating the theology of a rogue Jewish sect a thousand years later with its connotations. The message, also known as King David’s covenant with God was important enough to repeat itself in two of the T’nach’s (Old Testament) books. The content changes slightly from one passage to the next, with greater detail on who the individual in question will be in 1 Chronicles 17:11.

    2 Samuel 7:12-16 when your days are fulfilled and you lie down with your ancestors, I will raise up your offspring after you, who will come forth from your body, and I will establish his kingdom. He shall build a house for my name and I will establish the throne of his kingdom forever. I will be his Father and he will be my Son. When he commits iniquity, I will punish him with the rod such as mortals use, with blows inflicted by human beings. But my loving kindness shall not depart from him8.

    1 Chronicles 17:11 And it shall come to pass, when thy days be expired that thou must go to be with thy fathers, that I will raise up thy seed after thee, which shall be of thy sons; and I will establish his kingdom. He shall build me a house, and I will establish his throne for ever. I will be his father, and he shall be my son: and I will not take my mercy away from him, as I took it from him that was before thee: But I will settle him in mine house and in my kingdom forever: and his throne shall be established forevermore9.

     

     

    5. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p. 7- The evening star and the Morning star were known since ancient times to be associated with the planet Venus by the Assyrians aprox. 3000 BCE.
    6. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p. 4.
    7. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 11.
    8. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 278
    9. The Society for Distributing Hebrew Scriptures. The Holy Scriptures Hebrew and English. (Middlesex: Jered Publishing) p. 1714

     

    It is important to remember who the conveyer and recipients of the message are. Their identity is vital in correcting biblical scholars like J. Daniel Hays, Allen S. Maller and Baruch Hapburn, to name just a few that have made errors in the motivations that underlined King Solomon’s coronation in approximately 960 BCE. Solomon’s half-brother Adonijah had proclaimed himself king while David was ill. The group of three and others weren’t invited to Adonijah’s coronation, which suggested that Adonijah probably planned to kill them. Under mounting pressures Solomon, his mother Bathsheba and the prophet Nathan allegedly conspired to make Solomon, King David’s heir. Scholars believe that this was accomplished by lying to the sick monarch about a vow that David made to Bathsheba in the presence of the prophet Nathan. Scholars fail to recognize a trail of evidence that begins with 2 Samuel 7:12-16 and ends with 2 Samuel 12:24-25 which corroborates the story of the alleged conspirators. Furthermore these verses tend to be avoided for their connection to Jewish and Christian theology.
    In roughly 970 BCE after the prophet Nathan had revealed God’s promise to Jerusalem’s king, David and Bathsheba lost a child to an infant sickness (or because of an adulterous conception). After grieving for their loss they succeeded in giving birth to a second healthy ‘kosher’ son. This happy occasion was marked once again by a visit from the Prophet Nathan and another message from God.

    2 Samuel 12:24-25 then David consoled his wife Bathsheba, and went to her; and lay with her and she bore a son, and he named him Solomon. The Lord loved him, and sent a message by the prophet Nathan, and named him "Beloved of the Lord" (Jedidiah). Because of the Lord10.

    Karen Armstrong correctly identifies this moment as the event that branded Solomon David’s heir and God’s choice. Armstrong concludes that the name Yedidiah, “Beloved of Yahweh” is the indicator that Solomon is to succeed King David11. What Armstrong neglects to mention is that this is also the moment that confirms Solomon as the seed of David who will build God’s House and become God’s only begotten son.

     

    10. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 282. Although in many versions of the Bible only the name Jedidiah shows up in this verse, its translation is usually present in the footnotes.
    11. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p. 40.- An important admission from a Biblical scholar like Karen Armstrong which confirms the hypothesis that Solomon was indeed chosen by God to replace his father David on the throne and as the individual referred to in 2 Samuel chapter 7.


    2 Samuel 12:24-25 serves to remind David that God has begun to fulfill his promise. After Solomon’s coronation King David retells the entire story in private to Solomon and then publicly in the assembly of the people of Israel to confirm Solomon’s entitlement to the crown and connection to 2 Samuel 7:12-16.


    1 Chronicles 22:7-10 David said to Solomon, “My son, I had planned to build a house to the name of the Lord my God. But the word of the Lord came to me, saying, ‘You have shed much blood and have waged great wars; you shall not build a house to my name, because you have shed so much blood in my sight on the earth. See, a son shall be born to you; he shall be a man of peace. I will give him peace from all his enemies on every side; for his name shall be Solomon, and I will give peace and quiet to Israel in his days. He shall build a house for my name. He shall be my son, and I will be his father, and will establish his royal throne in Israel forever12.’”


    1 Chronicles 28:5-6 And of all my sons, for the Lord has given me many; he has chosen my son Solomon to sit upon the throne of the kingdom of the Lord over Israel. He said to me, "it is your son Solomon who shall build my house and my courts, for I have chosen him to be my son, and I will be his father….1 Chronicles 29:1 King David said to the whole assembly, "My son Solomon, whom alone, God has chosen, is young and inexperienced, and the work is great; for the Temple will not be for mortals but for the Lord God13.


    Solomon is the only individual who is begotten by God in the entire T’nach (Old Testament). Roddy L. Braun’s peer journal, Solomonic Apologetic in Chronicles, confirms the position that it was solely Solomon that was referred to in the Davidic covenant (2 Samuel chapter 7) but specifically 2 Samuel 7:14. The fact that this journal was written in 1973 also indicates a historic anchoring of the idea of King Solomon’s divine appointment to the throne and to the position of the God Shalem/ Yahweh’s only begotten son14.

     

     

    12. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 376.
    13. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 381.
    14. Braun, Roddy L. Solomonic Apologetic in Chronicles, Journal of Biblical Literature: Dec73, Vol. 92 Issue 4, p507.

     

    King David in a vision foresees what God is willing to do for his begotten son in Psalm 2:7-8. In this Psalm David reveals the inheritance that God’s son will reap. It is proper for David to refer to the vision in the first person since Solomon was chosen to fill his father’s position. This idea is repeated in the lives of Abraham and his son Isaac; Isaac is essentially void of his own identity and is linked to his father during Abraham’s life and after his death.


    Psalm 2:7-8 I will tell the decree of the Lord: He said to me, "You are my Son; today I have begotten you. Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage, and the ends of the earth your Possession16.

     

     

    15. Braun, Roddy L. Solomonic Apologetic in Chronicles, Journal of Biblical Literature: Dec73, Vol. 92 Issue 4, p507.
    16. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 482.

     

    Most likely produced before or shortly after Solomon’s birth, this Psalm incorporates a broad scope of the future. However, how can it be determined with certainty that this Psalm is talking about Solomon? The highlighted area allows one to connect this Psalm to Biblical records about Solomon. By recognizing that the God Shalem has indeed chosen Solomon as his son (which David confirms), a connection to other related passages of Solomon’s childhood can be linked. In the Following passages God invites Solomon to ask for his heart’s desires then after hearing his modest request, God declares him the greatest king that the world will ever witness and that no one would ever compare with him.

     

    1 Kings 3:5 At Gibeon the Lord appeared to Solomon in a dream by night; and God said "Ask what I should give you"…. 1 Kings 3:12 I now do according to your word. Indeed I give you a wise and discerning mind; no one like you has been before you and no one like you shall arise after you. I give you what you have not asked both riches and honor all your life; no other king will compare with you17.


    The way that God asks Solomon to choose what he desires in 1 Kings 3:5 is identical to what God reiterates in Psalm 2:7 and what Jesus proclaims to receive in the New Testament. In Hebrew and Islamic legends of King Solomon he is referred to as a bridge between all three monotheistic religions (Sarit Shalev- Eyni, Solomon, his Demons and Jongleurs: the Meeting of Islamic, Judaic and Christian Culture). Islam, Christianity and Judaism identified Solomon as king over the lower realm the earth, demons, the birds of the air and the beasts of the fields as well as the upper dominions of the angels. He used his power over demons to employ them in the construction of God’s Temple in Jerusalem. Solomon was considered the original exorcist, this may be the reason that Jesus asked the religious authorities, ‘And if I drive out demons by Beelzebub, by whom do your people drive them out?’ Solomon’s power over demons explains how he completed the Temple in only seven short years. Shalev- Eyni corroborates the little evidence in the Bible for Solomon’s supernatural attributes with 1 Kings 3:5-12 (above) which ‘offered a starting point for the development of this tradition18’. (Shalev- Eyni p. 380-81)

     


    17. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 302-03.
    18. Sarit Shalev- Eyni. Solomon, his Demons and Jongleurs: the Meeting of Islamic, Judaic and Christian Culture, Al-Masaq: Islam and the Medievel
    Mediterranean, Journal of Biblical Literature: Sept 2006, Vol. 18 Issue 2, p380-81.

     

    Beate Ego Offers a stunning view of Solomon’s image from a Jewish perspective in his Peer journal entitled All Kingdoms and Kings Trembled Before Him: The Image of King Solomon in Targum Sheni on Megillat Esther. In his Journal Ego incorporates passages from the Targum Sheni (meaning second translation) that have eerily similar themes to the New Testament and Jesus19. (Beate Ego p. 58-59)

    At the first Princeton Symposium on Judaism and Christian origins in 1985, the members of the symposium unanimously endorsed the opinion that the term Messiah in the Hebrew Bible refers “to a present, political and religious leader who is appointed by God, applied predominantly to a king, but also to a priest and occasionally a prophet20” (The Messiah Epithet in the Hebrew Bible, Thomas L. Thompson). Solomon was known to employ all three of these titles21 (Karen Armstrong p.89).
    In terms of Solomon’s multiple names the Targum Sheni mentions the reasons behind a few. Ego’s paper quotes the Targum Sheni and explains that Solomon was called Yedidiah (Jedidiah- beloved of God) because God loved him; he was called Solomon because peace flourished in his days. ‘They called him Ben (the Son) because he built the Temple for the Lord of the Hosts’. They called him Ithiel because God was with him and supported him. He was called Yaqe because he ruled over all the people in the East22 (Ego p. 59). The names Yaqe and Ithiel are especially unique because the name Yaqe mirrors one of two Princes of Rushalimum (Jerusalem) in the 1700’s BCE- Yq’rm23 (Karen Armstrong p. 7). Ithiel too is unique but for an entirely different reason; Ithiel translates into ‘God is with him’ the singular form of the Messianic name Immanuel, ‘God is with Us’.

    19. Beate, Ego. All Kingdoms and Kings Trembled Before Him: The Image of King Solomon in Targum Sheni on Megillat Esther. Journal for the Aramaic Bible, Dec2001, Vol. 3 Issue 1/2, p. 58-59- p. 59 gets into heavy detail about Solomon’s splendor and divine attributes.
    20. Thomas L. Thompson. The Messiah Epithet in the Hebrew Bible, Article is no longer available in the Douglas Collage data base? First page of the article is where this information is quoted verbatim.
    21. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p. 89
    22. Beate, Ego. All Kingdoms and Kings Trembled Before Him: The Image of King Solomon in Targum Sheni on Megillat Esther. Journal for the Aramaic Bible, Dec2001, Vol. 3 Issue 1/2, p. 59
    23. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p. 7

     

    Isaiah 7:14 Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign: the virgin will be with child and will give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel24.


    Solomon was said to be a ‘messianic mediator playing David’s role’ by Thomas L. Thompson. Thompson quotes Solomon at the dedication of the Temple asking God to forgive the people of their sins, ‘may God’s eyes, he prays, be open and may His ears be attentive so that He may hear the prayer that the messiah offers from a new Israel’s Temple25’ (p. 81 The Messiah Epithet in the Hebrew Bible, Thomas L. Thompson). Toward the end of Solomon’s life he wrote a book called Kohelet (Ecclesiastes), a book based on the author’s opinions accumulated through his wisdom and experiences. Yet this book seems to have a prophetic side to it as well. Ecclesiastes 4:13-16 captures the attention of a careful reader. It begins with a broad conversation about two people but then author moves from the vague to the specific.


    Ecclesiastes 4:13-16 Better a poor but wise youth than an old but foolish king who no longer has the sense to heed warnings. For the former can emerge from a dungeon to become king; while the latter, even if born to kingship, can become a pauper.[However] I reflected about all the living who walk under the sun with that youthful successor who steps into his place. Unnumbered are the multitudes of all those who preceded them; and later generations will not acclaim him either. For that too is futile and pursuit of wind26.


    What is most interesting about this passage is that king Solomon in his old age fell from grace because he did not heed the Deuteronomy warnings that pertained to Hebrew royalty. Jewish and Islamic legends state that after allowing one of his wives to build an idol that represented the girl’s deceased father, God punished Solomon by allowing the demon Sakhr (Asmodeus) to steal his magic ring and take his place on the throne. Solomon became ‘a poor wanderer, whose royal identity no one credited27’; this legend is closely connected to the king born into kingship that becomes a pauper in Ecclesiastes 4:15.

     

    24. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 626
    25. Thomas L. Thompson. The Messiah Epithet in the Hebrew Bible, Article is no longer available in the Douglas Collage data base? First page of the article is where this information is quoted verbatim. p. 81
    26. Michael V. Fox Phd. The JPS Bible Commentary Ecclesiastes, (Philidelphia:Jewish Publication Society 2004) p. 59-84
    27. Sarit Shalev- Eyni. Solomon, his Demons and Jongleurs: the Meeting of Islamic, Judaic and Christian Culture, Al-Masaq: Islam and the Medievel Mediterranean, Journal of Biblical Literature: Sept 2006, Vol. 18 Issue 2, p.155

    1 Kings 11:4 For when Solomon was old, his wives turned his heart after other gods; and his heart was not true to the Lord his God, as was the heart of his father David… the Lord, the God of Israel, who had appeared to him twice and had commanded him concerning this matter, that he should not follow other gods; but he did not observe what the Lord commanded28.


    Second: Jesus grew up poor but was known for his unusual wisdom. Jesus was to have ascended to sit at the right hand of God after his resurrection a day after coming out of Pontius Pilate’s prison. Sarit Shalev- Eyni states that ‘the Fathers of the Church and the medieval theologians saw Solomon as a perfect type of Christ29’ (Sarit Shalev- Eyni p. 155). It is estimated that 2.2 billion Christians and 1.2 billion Muslims follow the teachings of Jesus. And the Jews of the generations preceding and proceeding his death did not acclaim him or King Solomon for who they really represented.

    John 1:10-11 He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him30.

    Premise #1 King Solomon was begotten by God

    Premise #2 Jesus claimed to be God's only begotten son (John 3:16)

    Conclusion: Jesus must be the reincarnated King Solomon

    Second Temple Era 516 BCE - 70 CE

    The exiles arrived in Babylonia in 597 BCE; alienated from their God many had felt like ‘their world had come to an end’. In about 592 BCE one of these exiles, Ezekiel found God in a crippling vision where he described a ‘huge chariot drawn by four Cherubim… something shaped like a throne and high upon this throne was a being that looked like a man’. Was this man the Messiah? It couldn’t have been God, for Solomon was quoted at the dedication of the Temple saying, “Yet will God really live with men on the earth? Why the heavens and their own heavens cannot contain you. How much less this house that I have built!31” (Karen Armstrong p.83)

     


    28. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 312
    29. . Sarit Shalev- Eyni. Solomon, his Demons and Jongleurs: the Meeting of Islamic, Judaic and Christian Culture, Al-Masaq: Islam and the Medievel Mediterranean, Journal of Biblical Literature: Sept 2006, Vol. 18 Issue 2, p.155
    30. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 1250
    31. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p. 83

     

     

    In 516 CE after seventy years of exile King Cyrus permitted the Jews to repatriate back to Jerusalem to rebuild the city and the Temple of their God. Ezra the son of one of the Babylonian Jewish migrants was able to re-establish the Mosaic Law and cleanse the males of Israel of their pagan wives and children32 (Karen Armstrong p. 100- 01).

    During the Ezra period in 398 BCE ‘only those priests who were direct descendants of Zadok (Solomon’s anointed priest) would be allowed to enter the Temple buildings and perform the liturgy’. From 398 BCE onward, Jerusalem went through difficult changes beginning with the Macedonians under the rule of Alexander the Great in 333 BCE after the defeat of Darius III. Proceeding Alexander’s death in 323 BCE his kingdom was divided and Ptolemy I Soter became the ruler over Egypt and the Levant. By 200 BCE the Seleucid king Antiochus III had taken the majority of the Levant. Hellenism prevailed in Jerusalem until the Hasmonean revolution and around 64 BCE the Levant was broken up into Roman provinces. In 37 BCE Herod created the Temple Mount and began a project to rebuild the second Temple33.
    37 years later a child is born under alleged miraculous and prophetic circumstances into a world of Roman rule and oppression. During the early 1st Century CE, Jews are certain that their promised Messiah is close at hand and in 25- 30 CE a new Jewish sect has emerged with that child, now a man as their Messiah. What makes this sect and this Messiah different than others of the time is the light in which they paint him. John, Jesus’ beloved disciple and the author of the Gospel of John and the book of Revelation relates Jesus to ‘the Word of God’ but relates his sources to King Solomon’s Proverbs 8:12- 36. A proverb where Solomon begins by stating, “I, wisdom…” and then referring to himself as God’s child, “The Lord created me at the beginning of his work… then I was beside him like a little child and I was daily His delight rejoicing before him always”. In John’s Gospel he quotes Jesus in the infamous verse John 3:1634.

    John 3:16 For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son; so that everyone who believes in him may not parish but may have eternal life35.

    32. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p. 100- 01
    33. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p.91- 123
    34. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 582- 83
    35. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 1238

     

    It is here for the first time that the author reveals Jesus’ true identity. As has been detailed in this paper’s earlier sources, King Solomon was unquestioningly referred to as God’s son by his father David in multiple passages. If the Gospel’s accounts of Jesus’s words are accurate then the reader is left with no other option than to adhere to this conclusion.
    In the New Testament’s post resurrection book of Hebrews a similar inference is made. The book of Hebrews is material that Jews wrote to convert fellow Jews. Here the author specifies two verses that have been highlighted in this paper as passages that refer exclusively to King Solomon in the T’nach (Old Testament).

    Hebrews 1:1-5 Long ago God spoke to our ancestors in many and various ways by the Prophets, but in these last days he has spoken to us by a Son, whom he appointed heir of all things, through whom he also created the worlds. He is a reflection of Gods glory and the exact imprint of God's very being. And he sustains all things by his powerful word. When he had made purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on High. Having come as much superior to Angels as the name he has inherited is more excellent than theirs. For to which of the angels did God ever say "You are my Son today I have begotten you". Or again "I will be his Father, and he will be my Son36. (Psalm 2:7 and 2 Samuel 7:14)

    By this admission the author inevitably declared their ideology of Jesus’s identity. Although there is slight room for debate on the identity of the individual in Psalm 2:7, it is impossible to argue on the identity of the individual from 2 Samuel 7:14.

    Conclusion

    The Story of the Jewish Messiah has transcended thousands of years and numerous wars, exiles, and repatriations, yet the identity of the Messiah has remained the same. Although at times hidden, Jesus and his disciples have revealed King Solomon’s reincarnation through every word spoken in the New Testament. Jesus’s Beatitudes are just elaborations on the 25th Chapter of the book of Proverbs called ‘Proverbs of Solomon that the officials of King Hezekiah of Judah copied’.

     

    36. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 1359

    The most famous Christian teaching, love your enemies, isn’t Christian at all, it’s Jewish. The teaching of love those who hate you is located in two Gospels and one letter Luke 6:27, Matthew 5:43 and Romans 12:20; these teachings originate in proverbs 25:21.

    “If your enemy is hungry, give him food to eat; if he is thirsty, give him water to drink37”

    On page 2 of this paper the God Shalem is said to be associated with the setting sun or the evening star38. A few comments can be made here. Shalem in Hebrew means Peace; likewise Solomon’s name can be translated as Peaceful. It is obvious that Solomon was therefore named by and after this God. The book of Revelation quotes Jesus proclaiming the following message.

    Revelation 22:16 “I Jesus, have sent my angel to give you this testimony for the churches. I am the Root and the Offspring of David, and the Bright Morning Star39.”

    Both the evening star and the bright morning star are the same celestial body; they are both the planet Venus; thought to have been first discovered by the Assyrians in approximately the year 3000 BCE. Therefore by the God Shalem naming David’s son Solomon and Jesus calling himself ‘The Bright Morning Star’, he is in fact restating that they are the same person40.

     


    37. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 599
    38. Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths (New York: Ballantine Books, 2005), p. 7- The evening star and the Morning star were known since ancient times to be associated with the planet Venus by the Assyrians aprox. 3000 BCE.
    39. American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deuterocanonical Books. (New York: New Revised Standard Version 1989) p. 1404
    40. This is obviously preplanned by man or the divine; regardless this topic deserves further inquiry by those who are capable of the research.

     

     

     


    Bibliography:
    Armstrong, Karen. Jerusalem One City Three Faiths. New York:Ballantine Books, 2005.
    American Bible Society. Holy Bible with the Apocryphal/ Deutercanonical Books. New York: American Bible Society, 1989.
    Ego, Beate. All Kingdoms and Kings Trembled Before Him: The Image of King Solomon in Targum Sheni on Megillat Esther. Ego, Beate.Source: Journal for the Aramaic Bible; Dec2001, Vol. 3 Issue 1/2, p57, 17p.
    Shalev-Eyni, Sarit. Solomon, His Demons and Jongleurs: the Meeting of Islamic, Judaic and Christian Culture.1 saritse@h2.hum.huji.ac.il.Source:Al-Masaq: Islam & the Medieval Mediterranean; Sep2006, Vol. 18 Issue 2, p145-160, 16p, 1 Black and White Photograph, 3 Illustrations
    Braun, Roddy L. Solomonic Apologetic in Chronicles. Source: Journal of Biblical Literature; Dec73, Vol. 92 Issue 4, p503, 14p
    Thomas L. Thompson. The Messiah Epithet in the Hebrew Bible. Article is no longer available in the Douglas Collage data base? First page of the article is where this information is quoted verbatim.
    Michael V. Fox PhD. The JPS Bible Commentary Ecclesiastes. Philidelphia: Jewish Publication Society 2004

    *The idea for the information in this article was not taken from any other person or source, Internet or otherwise*

     

     

     

     

     

    What do you think of this story?

    Select one of the options below. Your feedback will help tell CNN producers what to do with this iReport. If you'd like, you can explain your choice in the comments below.
    Be and editor! Choose an option below:
      Awesome! Put this on TV! Almost! Needs work. This submission violates iReport's community guidelines.

    Comments

    Log in to comment

    iReport welcomes a lively discussion, so comments on iReports are not pre-screened before they post. See the iReport community guidelines for details about content that is not welcome on iReport.

    Add your Story Add your Story