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    Posted May 22, 2012 by
    smelserjl

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    The First (real) Egyptian Presidential Elections

     

    CNN PRODUCER NOTE     smelserjl shot these photos in Cairo of posters for Egyptian presidential candidates participating in the country's first election since the fall of the Mubarak regime. 'It seems that most people are very hopeful about the elections, but I've met quite a few people who think it won't make a difference because the military council [SCAF] will rig them in order to remain in charge,' she said. ' I think if Amr Moussa wins, violence will ensue because he was part of Hosni Mubarak's regime. If Abu Al-Fatoh or Mohamed Morsi wins, perhaps not. It's really hard to tell.'
    - jmsaba, CNN iReport producer

    I've been residing in Cairo since January 2012 and much has changed--including Tahrir Square--since the Revolution last year. Finally, the Presidential Elections are upon us. Tomorrow and Thursday, Egyptians will vote in their first (supposedly) free Presidential Elections. What will happen?

    Depending on what opinion poll you read, Amr Moussa, Abu el-Fatoh, or Mohamed Morsi appears to be taking the lead. There are a total of 12 candidates, but those associated with the Muslim Brotherhood or Hosni Mubarak seem to be the most popular but not necessarily because of their campaign stances--they all tend to say the same thing. It remains to be seen, however, who will be chosen and also what may happen immediately afterwards.

     

    A few weeks ago, Cairo experience a period of unrest once again in Abbasiyya Square following the disqualification of Hazim Abu Ismail, the candidate supported by the Salafist Nour Party. It appears that the military and police are preparing for this once again. Almasry Alyoum reports that military vehicles are driving around Medinat Nasr, Cairo proper and Giza encouraging citizens to vote. Yesterday, al-Jazeera reported that there would be a fine of 100 Egyptian pounds for those citizens who refuse to vote. It's a right to vote, but an imposed right it seems.

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