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    Posted October 27, 2012 by
    Hylin
    Location
    Mbour, Senegal
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Photo essays: Your stories in pictures

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    The Slaughter in Senegal - Tabaski

     

    It’s dusk in Mbour on the 26th of October 2012. In the morning mist before it’s time to visit the mosque at 9 am, the resistant sheep are cleaned in the salty water of the Atlantic Ocean. An hour later between three and four million sheep are sacrificed, in Senegal alone, on this very important muslim festival also known as the “Feast of Sacrifice.” In most Muslim countries it is called Eid al-Adha but in much of West Africa it is called Tabaski and it commemorates Abraham’s faith and devotion to God.

    According to Muslim belief God asked Abraham to sacrifice his son, and although he was a good man and loved his son; his faith and devotion to God was strong enough that he would accommodate God’s request. Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his own son for God caused God to spare his son’s life, and a ram was sacrificed in his place.

    On Tabaski a sheep (or a goat) is slaughtered as a symbolic gesture of the ram that God substituted for Abraham’s son.

    But here, in the neighborhood of Dar us Salam it’s not only about religion. It’s also a time to meet your family from afar, to eat and to dress up.

    According to Muslim belief God asked Abraham to sacrifice his son, and although he was a good man and loved his son; his faith and devotion to God was strong enough that he would accommodate God’s request. Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his own son for God caused God to spare his son’s life, and a ram was sacrificed in his place.

    On Tabaski a sheep (or a goat) is slaughtered as a symbolic gesture of the ram that God substituted for Abraham’s son.

    But here, in the neighborhood of Dar us Salam it’s not only about religion. It’s also a time to meet your family from afar, to eat and to enjoy. Most kids, all dressed up, walk the streets and knock on doors asking for small donations.

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