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    Posted December 27, 2012 by
    hammondcast
    Location
    Germany
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Your rock and roll memories

    More from hammondcast

    Encore Hammond's Bolero

     

    Encore Hammond's Bolero Jon's Journal December 27 2012  *WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Encore 'Hammond's Bolero' Downloaded 394 times  KYOURADIO.org Encore 'Hammond's Bolero' 10th year Jazzkeller Hofheim JON HAMMOND Trio  JON HAMMOND Trio: HEINZ LICHIUS - drums JOE BERGER - guitar JON HAMMOND - XK-1 Hammond Organ/bass called back fro Encore, 10th consecutive year playing at Jazzkeller Hofheim "After Musikmesse Party 2007" This tune features Joe Berger in tribute to CARLOS SANTANA Jon's former neighbor in Marin County California http://archive.org/details/JonHammondEncore_Hammond_sBolero_10thyearJazzkellerHofheimJONHAMMONDTrio Youtube http://youtu.be/T8qIRPGrLEY  Fixer Upper - Needs a little bit of work...also some trains (and the train tracks restored that were sadly ripped out) - 16th Street Train Station - West Oakland 16th and Wood St. - Jon Hammond  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16th_Street_Station_(Oakland) *I used used to take the Key Route trains through this Art Deco train station folks - JH The 16th Street Station is one of three original train stations that served Oakland, California at the start of the 20th century. The building was designed by architect Jarvis Hunt who was a preeminent train station architect at that time and the facility opened in 1912. For many decades, the 16th Street Station was a major railroad station of the Southern Pacific railroad in Oakland as well as local commuter services such as the East Bay Electric Lines via elevated platforms. It was a companion (or "city station") for the Oakland Terminal, which was located two miles away on the Oakland Pier. The Terminal, also known as the "Mole", was demolished in 1960, leaving the 16th Street Station as the major Oakland rail hub. It suffered significant damage in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and was closed. Its railroad function has since been replaced by the major Amtrak station in nearby Emeryville. Amtrak service ended on August 5, 1994.[1] The station is located in West Oakland at 16th and Wood Streets, adjacent to and visible from the Interstate 880 connector ramps of the MacArthur Maze. The station buildings remain, largely intact, including the switchman's tower and ironwork elevated platforms which, before the completion of the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge, were utilized by commuter trains of SP's East Bay Electric Lines. The station was purchased in 2005 by BUILD, an affiliate of BRIDGE Housing. It is being restored as part of a local redevelopment project[2][3] and will not be used as a railroad station again. The tracks of the Southern Pacific (now Union Pacific) main line were moved westward in the 1990s and today run on the other side of I-880, leaving the station isolated. The station was used in films such as Funny Lady and Hemingway & Gellhorn. The original 16th Street depot was a smaller wood structure, built at a time when the site was on the shoreline of San Francisco Bay. In the intervening years, the shoreline was filled in and now lies nearly a mile west. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_System Transbay rail lines Until the Bay Bridge railway began operation, Key commuter trains had no letter designation. They were named for the principal street or district they served.   Good Citizen - Hard Work, headed to Bottle Recycling Center - Jon Hammond  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recycling Recycling is processing used materials (waste) into new products to prevent waste of potentially useful materials, reduce the consumption of fresh raw materials, reduce energy usage, reduce air pollution (from incineration) and water pollution (from landfilling) by reducing the need for "conventional" waste disposal, and lower greenhouse gas emissions as compared to plastic production.[1][2] Recycling is a key component of modern waste reduction and is the third component of the "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle" waste hierarchy. There are some ISO standards relating to recycling such as ISO 15270:2008 for plastics waste and ISO 14001:2004 for environmental management control of recycling practice. Recyclable materials include many kinds of glass, paper, metal, plastic, textiles, and electronics. Although similar in effect, the composting or other reuse of biodegradable waste – such as food or garden waste – is not typically considered recycling.[2] Materials to be recycled are either brought to a collection center or picked up from the curbside, then sorted, cleaned, and reprocessed into new materials bound for manufacturing.   Custom paint job on this Love Bus! Jon Hammond  The White House (not Washington DC one!) Jon Hammond  Oakland California -- Esther's Orbit Room - Jon Hammond The blues return to Oakland's 7th Street  Youtube http://youtu.be/YPls6GyHaa4 Esther Mabry of Esther's Orbit Room in Oakland, California Esther Mabry, 90, the "Grand Lady of 7th Street", and the owner of Esther's Orbit Room in Oakland, died on May 31. She reminisces in this interview from 2009. Many blues greats including B.B. King, Jimmy McCracklin, Charles Brown, Etta James, Big Mama Thornton and Lowell Fulson played at her club in the 1960s. http://www.insidebayarea.com/top-stories/ci_15206146 Plaques recall when live music, not bullets, lighted up the nights. http://articles.latimes.com/2011/dec/07/local/la-me-oakland-blues-20111207 Lee Romney:  OAKLAND — Ronnie Stewart bent down along the sidewalk beneath West Oakland's regional transit station and gingerly slid a prototype plaque into place. After more than two decades of cajoling, his Walk of Fame was finally taking shape.  A trail of granite markers adorned with musical notes and this city's signature oak tree soon will decorate 7th Street, bearing the names of 84 rhythm-and-blues greats who in the 1940s turned this now mostly barren corridor into a "Harlem of the West."  For The Record Los Angeles Times Thursday, December 08, 2011 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 4 News Desk 1 inches; 33 words Type of Material: Correction Oakland blues: An article in the Dec. 7 LATExtra section about Oakland's blues history said Aretha Franklin was among those who played the clubs "after WWII." Franklin first played in Oakland around 1960  *WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Encore 'Hammond's Bolero' Downloaded 394 times  KYOURADIO.org Encore 'Hammond's Bolero' 10th year Jazzkeller Hofheim JON HAMMOND Trio  JON HAMMOND Trio: HEINZ LICHIUS - drums JOE BERGER - guitar JON HAMMOND - XK-1 Hammond Organ/bass called back fro Encore, 10th consecutive year playing at Jazzkeller Hofheim "After Musikmesse Party 2007" This tune features Joe Berger in tribute to CARLOS SANTANA Jon's former neighbor in Marin County California http://archive.org/details/JonHammondEncore_Hammond_sBolero_10thyearJazzkellerHofheimJONHAMMONDTrio Youtube http://youtu.be/T8qIRPGrLEY  Fixer Upper - Needs a little bit of work...also some trains (and the train tracks restored that were sadly ripped out) - 16th Street Train Station - West Oakland 16th and Wood St. - Jon Hammond  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16th_Street_Station_(Oakland) *I used used to take the Key Route trains through this Art Deco train station folks - JH The 16th Street Station is one of three original train stations that served Oakland, California at the start of the 20th century. The building was designed by architect Jarvis Hunt who was a preeminent train station architect at that time and the facility opened in 1912. For many decades, the 16th Street Station was a major railroad station of the Southern Pacific railroad in Oakland as well as local commuter services such as the East Bay Electric Lines via elevated platforms. It was a companion (or "city station") for the Oakland Terminal, which was located two miles away on the Oakland Pier. The Terminal, also known as the "Mole", was demolished in 1960, leaving the 16th Street Station as the major Oakland rail hub. It suffered significant damage in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and was closed. Its railroad function has since been replaced by the major Amtrak station in nearby Emeryville. Amtrak service ended on August 5, 1994.[1] The station is located in West Oakland at 16th and Wood Streets, adjacent to and visible from the Interstate 880 connector ramps of the MacArthur Maze. The station buildings remain, largely intact, including the switchman's tower and ironwork elevated platforms which, before the completion of the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge, were utilized by commuter trains of SP's East Bay Electric Lines. The station was purchased in 2005 by BUILD, an affiliate of BRIDGE Housing. It is being restored as part of a local redevelopment project[2][3] and will not be used as a railroad station again. The tracks of the Southern Pacific (now Union Pacific) main line were moved westward in the 1990s and today run on the other side of I-880, leaving the station isolated. The station was used in films such as Funny Lady and Hemingway & Gellhorn. The original 16th Street depot was a smaller wood structure, built at a time when the site was on the shoreline of San Francisco Bay. In the intervening years, the shoreline was filled in and now lies nearly a mile west. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_System Transbay rail lines Until the Bay Bridge railway began operation, Key commuter trains had no letter designation. They were named for the principal street or district they served.   Good Citizen - Hard Work, headed to Bottle Recycling Center - Jon Hammond  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recycling Recycling is processing used materials (waste) into new products to prevent waste of potentially useful materials, reduce the consumption of fresh raw materials, reduce energy usage, reduce air pollution (from incineration) and water pollution (from landfilling) by reducing the need for "conventional" waste disposal, and lower greenhouse gas emissions as compared to plastic production.[1][2] Recycling is a key component of modern waste reduction and is the third component of the "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle" waste hierarchy. There are some ISO standards relating to recycling such as ISO 15270:2008 for plastics waste and ISO 14001:2004 for environmental management control of recycling practice. Recyclable materials include many kinds of glass, paper, metal, plastic, textiles, and electronics. Although similar in effect, the composting or other reuse of biodegradable waste – such as food or garden waste – is not typically considered recycling.[2] Materials to be recycled are either brought to a collection center or picked up from the curbside, then sorted, cleaned, and reprocessed into new materials bound for manufacturing.   Custom paint job on this Love Bus! Jon Hammond  The White House (not Washington DC one!) Jon Hammond  Oakland California -- Esther's Orbit Room - Jon Hammond The blues return to Oakland's 7th Street  Youtube http://youtu.be/YPls6GyHaa4 Esther Mabry of Esther's Orbit Room in Oakland, California Esther Mabry, 90, the "Grand Lady of 7th Street", and the owner of Esther's Orbit Room in Oakland, died on May 31. She reminisces in this interview from 2009. Many blues greats including B.B. King, Jimmy McCracklin, Charles Brown, Etta James, Big Mama Thornton and Lowell Fulson played at her club in the 1960s. http://www.insidebayarea.com/top-stories/ci_15206146 Plaques recall when live music, not bullets, lighted up the nights. http://articles.latimes.com/2011/dec/07/local/la-me-oakland-blues-20111207 Lee Romney:  OAKLAND — Ronnie Stewart bent down along the sidewalk beneath West Oakland's regional transit station and gingerly slid a prototype plaque into place. After more than two decades of cajoling, his Walk of Fame was finally taking shape.  A trail of granite markers adorned with musical notes and this city's signature oak tree soon will decorate 7th Street, bearing the names of 84 rhythm-and-blues greats who in the 1940s turned this now mostly barren corridor into a "Harlem of the West."  For The Record Los Angeles Times Thursday, December 08, 2011 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 4 News Desk 1 inches; 33 words Type of Material: Correction Oakland blues: An article in the Dec. 7 LATExtra section about Oakland's blues history said Aretha Franklin was among those who played the clubs "after WWII." Franklin first played in Oakland around 1960 

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