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    Posted January 15, 2013 by
    sseeley76
    Location
    Virginia
    Assignment
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    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    The written word: Your personal essays

    Mother to Mother: My plea to First Lady Michelle Obama

     

    CNN PRODUCER NOTE     sseeley76 is part of a network of adoptive moms speaking out in a 'virtual rally' to help those stuck in the Russian adoption process after Russia banned adoptions by U.S. families. The law takes effect in 2014. A U.S. State Department spokesperson said officials are 'very hopeful that we will be able to complete the cases of adoption that had been begun before the law was passed.' But this mother says evidence points to the contrary. 'I don't know that our pleas will work but when my friend called me the other day after having her court date cancelled and cried desperately because she was broken hearted at the loss of that child, I knew I would do anything I can to help soften that loss.'
    - dsashin, CNN iReport producer

    A few days ago thousands of Russian citizens marched in protest of their governement's new legislation banning adoptions to American families. There are more than 700,000 orphans in Russia; 120,000 of those eligible for adoption. Many of those children have families here in the United States wanting desperately to bring them home. I watched in amazement as these Russian individuals braved the cold weather and possible arrest to make a point. And then I looked at my son, who just six months ago lived in a Russian orphanage and thought: "Where is the fight on our side?" And so I reach out, the only way I know how and make an appeal to a mother's heart:

     

    Dear Mrs. Obama,

     

    I am writing you today to ask for help with a concern that weighs so heavily on my heart. As I am sure you are aware, Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a law that essentially ends inter country adoption between the United States and Russia. I could give you thousands of reasons why that legislation is cruel and unjust but instead I will give you just one: my child’s eyes.

     

    I met my son Aleksandr at the age of 10 months in February of last year. I knew from the moment his eyes looked into mine, that he was indeed the child of my heart. This was not because his eyes sparkled with love and excitement but rather because they looked so uncertain. “Who are you?" those blue eyes said to me. And my soul answered: I am your mother. While other mother’s can look into their child’s eyes for the first time and say, “Welcome to the world Little One,” I understood that my little one already knew too much of this world’s chilling cruelty and I promised then and there to give him all the love and protection that a mother can give.

     

    On August 4, 2012 we brought Aleks home at 15 months of age. He was quickly diagnosed as failure to thrive and he has global developmental delays but through amazing programs available through the state of Virginia and the excellent medical care and support of our military community, Aleks is flourishing and “catching up” to others in his age group! He loves pigs and horses, coconut yogurt and “Here Comes the Sun” by the Beatles. He leans in to give the sweetest kisses to his Momma and Daddy and the twinkle in his eyes (that was absent when we met him) lights up my world. I never imagined that my husband and I would have to travel halfway across the world three times to find our son. But I would do it again and again.

     

    My family is a success story and a blessing thanks to cooperation between this great nation and Russia. But right now, mothers here in this country cry desperately because they are losing their child due to this legislation. A child who has the chance to know a mother’s love will be condemned to life in a less than adequate orphanage where he or she will not ever develop a sense of self worth or know the love of family. What if that was my son? Oh God, I don’t know how I would ever rest if my child were kept from me in those circumstances. And that is why I am writing to you today.

     

    Please, Mrs. Obama, I beg you to speak with your husband on behalf of all the mothers stuck in this limbo, those who have officially started the adoption process, who have held their babies in their arms or have stared deep into the eyes of their child a half a world away. We respectfully ask that President Obama and Vice President Biden appeal to Mr. Putin from a humanitarian stand point and fight for the child’s right to be able to continue to know the mother’s love they had a glimpse of on that first meeting. We hope and pray for an agreement that allows the families who have already petitioned to adopt their child in Russia to be united as a family. What do we lose in trying?

     

    (Photo courtesy Ellari Photography)

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