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    Posted April 5, 2013 by
    MahmoudGamal
    Location
    Cairo, Egypt
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    Ikhwanized Egypt

     

    CNN PRODUCER NOTE     Long lines at gas stations, uncollected trash and higher food prices, the results of an economic crisis in Egypt as experienced by iReporter MahmoudGamal in Giza. He says electricity and water bills have risen to the extent that families are taking their sons out of school to work, while mothers "spend a great deal of their time in queues for bread and gas pipes and would be lucky if they come back with anything". He says he blames the current government under President Mohamed Morsy. "The government can at least control the market and focus on having a plan to control the economic crisis instead of making things worse," he says.
    - sarahbrowngb, CNN iReport producer

    When Egyptians toppled a tyrant in 2011, they never thought they'd be having a new one in less than two years. After ten months of Ikhwani rule, their man, President Mohamed Morsi, has proved to be a carbon copy of Mubarak, plus a beard. Let's have a look at the current situation in Ikhwanized Egypt

     

    Although I haven't been directly affected by unemployment, many of my friends did. University graduates that should be working as journalists, engineers, accountants..etc now work as waiters or taxi drivers.

     

    Prices of all goods have jumped, an effect of the diesel shortage which is used by shipping trucks.

     

    The prime minister's new economic policies have also affected prices on all levels. After the gas pipes' prices have now increased, the black market has been given more space to work. This will also result in prices of cooked food jumping higher.

     

    While the PM plays "Smurfs Village" on his iPhone, many Egyptians continue to live an inhumane life. In slums like Manshyet Nasser, people drown in oceans of garbage and smell nothing but polluted air. They fail to pay money for the garbage collector since the government already takes a fee for it and never collects it. Paying the electricity and water bills have become a burden on every father, which sometimes results in making them take their sons out of school to work. Mothers spend a great deal of their time in queues for bread and gas pipes and would be lucky if they come back with anything.

     

    The government can at least control the market and focus on having a plan to control the economic crisis instead of making things worse. Unfortunately they have no clear program or time to think of one since they spend most of their working hours sending journalists and activists to prison!

    **Text by: Mariam Saleh (mariam-saleh.blogspot.com)

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