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    Posted June 5, 2013 by
    oklahomapray
    Location
    Tullahoma, Tennessee

    oklahomapray and 14 other iReporters contributed to Open Story: Tornado pummels Moore, Oklahoma

    Answering a prayer for Oklahoma tornado victims

     
    STOPPING A TORNADO. Airborne M.A.S.E.R.S + Supercomputers The Mangino Solution.

    Since the spring of 1968, I have often thought about developing a method for preventing funnel clouds from forming or stopping a tornado that has already formed and causing destruction. It started in a science class in the 5th grade, in 1968 when I was 10 years old. Our class that day was about tornados, and in 1968, researchers were just starting to learn how they formed. During the lesson, I asked the teacher if anyone had ever stopped a tornado before. The thought of stopping a tornado was so outlandish at the time that everyone in class had a good laugh. At the end of the class, I asked the teacher what would happen if someone were to strap oven eyes, like on a stove, along the side of a jet airliner. Of course, everyone had another laugh at my expense. In my young mind, I thought that huge oven eyes would heat the air and somehow disrupt the formation of tornados.Thirty years later, in 1998, I found myself in the direct path of a large tornado in Alabama. This harrowing event brought back all of the interest I had as a young boy in how to stop the formation of a tornado. I could not stop thinking about it. By December 2006, I had come up with a more advanced solution. My idea was that of developing an Airborne MASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation). Think of your microwave oven. In microwave cooking, a magnetron generates radio waves that penetrate the food and excite water and fat molecules. There is heat everywhere all at once because the molecules are all excited together. The microwave heating process is different from a conventional oven because you are "exciting atoms" rather than "conducting heat". The process of exciting atoms heats the food, and it is the same process that can heat matter in and around the formation of a tornado funnel. By disrupting the air patterns in the sky at two different altitudes with two different MASERS, the circular pattern could be quickly disrupted.During development, supercomputers using computational fluid dynamics and sophisticated modeling and simulation software would be used to provide 3-dimensional models researchers could use to determine the exact power the MASER needs to excite the atoms, where the waves should be aimed, the duration needed, optimum placement and movement of the MASER and a multitude of other variables. Once the actual MASER is developed, onboard computing power would be sufficient to perform all of the actions needed to operate the MASER. Ultimately, MASERS could be made that were cost efficient, easier to manufacture and operate and could potentially be small enough to be mobile or mounted in numerous locations where tornados occur frequently.The resources for developing a MASER specifically made for stopping tornados already exist. The U.S. owns many of the world’s largest supercomputers as well as secure fiber optic networks that could be used to connect researchers all over the. Modeling and simulation software and hardware are already being used in similar ways, and now, after the devastating tornados in Oklahoma in May 2013, there is a national focus on the problem. What is needed is for a government organization or large university to take the lead in developing the initial research program, and funding is needed that will ensure research doesn’t get lost in the shuffle, resources are not allocated to other projects and that policy makers keep the project alive for the time needed to develop a working prototype. In the not too distant future, the use of MASERS could be as common as weather forecasters using supercomputers and radar to predict and track weather in real-time. Along with existing STEM (science, technology engineering and math) programs, degree programs with a focus on using MASERS for a variety of purposes could advance the research immensely. In the future, preventing or stopping tornados could save countless lives and billions of dollars in damage to homes, business, national infrastructure and our economy. The April 27, 2011 tornado that devastated Phil Campbell, Alabama killed two good friends of mine. After seeing the destruction on YouTube and learning of my friend’s deaths, I started working on a video and a program titled STOPPING a TORNADO INITIATIVE 2012. That was the title of my first YouTube video and the STEM program I would start. Now, I have a second video that outlines my solution on stopping a tornado on the ground. After the recent horror caused by the tornado's in and around Moore, Oklahoma, media interest in my ideas has increased immensely. I have been interviewed by The Tennessean newspaper, featured on their website and appeared on a local talk show. In the year leading up to the tornados in Oklahoma, I had made over 2000 attempts by phone, sending DVDs, letters, and Emails to generate interest in my idea. I regret that it took disasters like those in Oklahoma for me to get an opportunity to explain my idea. After 45 years of developing this idea, all I ask is for experts in policy makers to look at my idea with an open mind, to think outside the box for a moment and imagine the possibilities if my idea becomes a reality. I know a solution to stopping tornados will not be developed over night, but the technology is available now to make this happen. The TV interview is on YouTube, “LIVING 05-28-2013” and my interview starts 26 minutes and 45 seconds into the program. It lasts about 10 minutes. My theory on how to prevent a tornado from touching down is on YouTube, “STOPPING a TORNADO INITIATIVE 2012, CHUCK MANGINO” and it is 10 minutes long and gives a very basic explanation of my theory. My theory on stopping a tornado on the ground is on YouTube, “STOPPING a TORNADO PART 2, 2013, CHUCK MANGINO”. The article appeared in The Tennessean newspaper on their website in the May 23, 2013 issue and is titled Tennessee man says microwave technology can stop tornadoes. I hope you will take the time to watch the videos or read the articles on my ideas and take positive actions to carry the research further.
    CHUCK MANGINO
    213 Bragg Circle
    Tullahoma , Tenn. 37388

    931-393-3674

    chuckmangino51@gmail.com
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