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    Posted July 3, 2013 by
    HasanAmin86
    Assignment
    Assignment
    This iReport is part of an assignment:
    Protests in Egypt: Your experiences

    More from HasanAmin86

    It's Egyptian Revolution not a coup d'état, CNN!

     

    CNN PRODUCER NOTE     Longtime iReporter and iReport Awards recipient Hasan Amin of Cairo, Egypt, voted for former President Mohamed Morsy. But after much disappointment in Morsy’s leadership, Amin started protesting against the now-deposed leader. Citing gas shortages, security issues and Egyptians lacking “essential needs,” Amin says Morsy did not live up to his promises. The 26-year-old freelance photographer has been covering the protests in Egypt for more than a year.

    “Seeing the whole thing, from the street point of view, I am biased,” he said. “I have seen millions and more in the street protesting than when Morsy won the election last year. Yesterday it was more authentic, more driven, more deep. People here in Egypt felt relief.” CNN has reported that hundreds of thousands of people were protesting.

    “It’s a war against some community members that think that they can force all the Egyptian people to accept this abnormal situation. We voted for a secular, democratic state. And they want to transform it into Afghanistan,” he said.

    As for what inspired Amin to write this piece, he calls what happened in Egypt a revolution, not a coup. An Egyptian ambassador told CNN's Christiane Amanpour the same thing.CNN reported that on July 3 the Egyptian military deposed Morsy. “I’m not forcing CNN to adopt my point of view, but I just want to tell you what people think,” he said.

    Related video: Egypt's battle over the word coup

    In the iReport text below, Amin reflects some personal thoughts about the state of Egypt’s government in the past year. Some of his claims on the state of the government have not been confirmed by CNN.
    - zdan, CNN iReport producer

    It's Egyptian Revolution not a coup d'état, CNN!
    “The biggest human gathering in the history of the Middle East” _BBC headline about Egyptian popular rising against Morsi in 30th of June 2013.

    Determined Egyptians hit the streets in millions (according to Reuters) Forming mass protest against Morsi, the crowds are even more than the double who voted for him! I’m surprised that you are surprised! Egyptians protested against Morsi in the past year dozens of times, and he suppressed, arrested, tortured even killed them. He failed Egyptians time after time, I reported so many iReports about this and you can check my report (won the 3rd Annual CNN iReport Award 2013) the report was made in November 2012 with title:
    Egyptian Revolution rages on (against new dictatorship)

    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-886658
    why you should trust me and believe my words?

    Because I’m one of the Egyptians who actually brought Mohamed Morsi to power, I voted for him!
    I published here in CNN a report about Morsi’ early wining, while CNN published faulty news says exact the opposite, that Ahmed Shafik (the other candidate of former and last prime minister of Mubarak old regime) who is the winner? And let me quote the CNN producer note after he called me to vet my story with an obvious surprising tone in his voice:
    “CNN PRODUCER NOTE     HasanAmin86 of Cairo documents a celebration of Mohamed Morsi's declared victory as Egypt's first democratically elected president. "It was a relief," he says. "We finally have a president who will start to build our country." The photos were captured at Tahrir Square on June 18.
    - stein0726, CNN iReport producer”
    and here’s the links!

    First Elected Egyptian President

    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-805605

    http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2012/06/22/report-shafik-to-be-named-egypt-president/

    and here’s the snapshot of the deleted post.

    https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/1017392_10151536013588129_880809722_n.jpg

     

    I’m also not famous for being biased to the army, au contraire! I’ve had bad experience during covering Egyptian Cabinet Sit-in in December 2011, and I reported what happened after that, and you easily can check my CNN iReport archive to make sure of what I’m saying.

    Egyptian Armed Forces Kills and Arrest Peaceful Protesters in MOD Sit-In

    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-785745

    First Memorial of Maspero (Copts’ Massacre) Video
    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-861203

    Morsi and his fascist folks humiliated Egyptians.. All of them!
    No gas, No money, No jobs, No tourism, No electricity, No water, No security, No freedom of expression, No nothing!

    Morsi didn’t keep any of his promises, all (and I mean ALL) of his promises turned out that to be false and just blah-blahing.

    I insist kindly take some time to review my previous articles, if you really are seeking the truth.

    First serious protest act against Morsi (it’s in August 2012, just one single month since he been elected)

    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-832334

     

    Today, Egyptians are extremely happy, they are happier than 11th of Feb 2011, the day they succeed to make Mubarak step down, they are happier than the day when Morsi won the election last year!

    Egyptians Great Expectations: Civilian President for a starter

    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-807767

    Egyptians are not only happy for flushing out a new dictator, they are happy because they proved to the world that people are really capable of change, they taught the world what democracy is all about, it’s about what people want! What people need! Egyptians, and I’m proudly one of them, are the ones who brought Morsi to power, and when he let them down time after time, and tested their patience for a long horrible year, they stood in front of him, united, forgetting all of their disagreements.

    They said it out loudly: “NO! Step down Morsi!”
    Egyptians are decent, tolerant, very generous and hospitable people. They forgave Morsi for so many times for very awful humiliating crimes he committed to them.

    But enough is enough. Army just responded (so lately) to people loud voice. Army should protect its people; this is exactly what Egyptian army did.

    FYI, Morsi supporters, who killed and tortured the protesters before (last December around the presidential palace, check my reports here:
    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-891413

    And here:

    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-891987

    They left unlawfully not questioned because of their biased prosecutor general, they killed around 60 innocent peaceful protesters all over Egypt only in the last couple of days! Not to mention hundreds of dangerously wounded, imagine the bloodbath if those continued in power! They are Jihadists, extremists and used to eliminate their opponents not to discuss and sit and talk!

    I’m so tired because since 28th of June and I’m covering the mass protest, So.. Final word, what happened in Egypt is “people urge to impeach a dictator and national army honorable response.”

    CNN, please stay unbiased.

    Hasan Amin

    Cairo, Egypt

    3-7-2013

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